PHNW5 conference: Congratulations on a very impressive event!

The Pacific Northwest Passive House community is the oldest and largest in the country and consequently leads the nation in built, certified projects.  The progress is amazing: When I keynoted the very first PHNW meeting in Olympia, there were about a 100 people, a handful of exhibitors. The number and quantity of presentations and exhibits last week at this year’s even was breathtaking.

PHIUS first brought its CPHC training programs to Portland and Seattle in 2009. Today, of more than 1500 professionals who have taken PHIUS CPHC or Builder training, approximately 300 reside in the Northwest.

Two builders/CPHCs are among those who helped lead the way by building spec projects: Blake Bilyeu’s and his dad’s project in Salem, Ore. (The Rue-Evans House), and  Dan Whitmore’s first passive house project in Seattle. Rob Hawthorne, too, has played a leading role with his Corehaus (which was on the projects tour at the 5th Annual North American Passive House conference, along with Blake’s), Trekhaus and 02Haus. Many, many have joined them. What a success story for the PHNW and the entire PH community!  That’s why I’m giving them a shout out—and I hope my good readers will pass along word of all the good work.

It was gratifying to see that most presented projects at PHNW had been designed, consulted on, built by or rated through PHIUS CPHCs, PHIUS Certified Builders and/or PHIUS+ raters. Nearly all projects put a premium on rigorous third party quality assurance and went with the PHIUS+ Certification program. Thank you for your vote of confidence and continued support of PHIUS. It is much appreciated.

Now, to some conference highlights: Kudos to the Stellar Apartments in Eugene, Ore., the very first PHIUS+ Certified affordable multifamily project! Stellar received PHIUS+ certification in 2013. What a milestone! Congratulations go to Jan Fillinger and Win Swafford as the lead CPHCs/architects on the project and Peter Reppe, also a CPHC, who designed the mechanical system.  University of Oregon Professor Alison Kwok—a former PHIUS board member and a CPHC, and her students pushed the research envelope and presented a detailed study of  measured results of the fully occupied apartments since last September. The developer had decided to build side-by-side examples of the same project: One is built to passive standards, one to Earth Advantage/Energy Star. The student team compared the results of the two test buildings, an excellent comparative study. Stay tuned for final results! I am sure we are going to see a great paper come out of these efforts.

Another highlight: The 19 unit Kiln Apartments in Portland is almost completed and awaiting final PHIUS+ certification. David Posada, who was in the very first CPHC class in Portland, approached me at the 3rdPHNW conference and told me about this multifamily project he wanted to pitch. Thanks to his persistence, it became real. PHIUS stayed involved with David through the PHIUS+ certification process and onsite verification by our PHIUS+ Raters and CPHCs in Portland, Skylar Swinford and Ryan Shanahan.

Skylar and Ryan presented on their quality assurance experience with this project. I was fortunate enough to get a spot on the tour, the only one for which this project is ever going to open its doors for, on Saturday. Truly a pleasure! Thank you, David, for moving this pioneering project forward. I can already see the ripple effect elsewhere in the country. Thank you, Skylar and Ryan, the extremely talented rater team pioneering the onsite verification, and of course also thank you to the architects on this project. It is an exceptionally handsome and exciting building!

The educational content of the conference was on par with the quality of PHIUS annual North American Passive House Conferences: the Northwest was not afraid of the most recent discussions in the field.

PHIUS is proud to note that PHIUS trainers, tech committee and board members Prudence Ferreira, Adam Cohen, Thorsten Chlupp and Chris Benedict presented 4 workshops during the pre-conference program. Prudence covered WUFI dynamic modeling, Chris reviewed multi-family Brooklyn and Manhattan (Chris’s project is also awaiting final PHIUS+ certification and was quality assured through Terry Brennan). Thorsten Chlupp’s presented his invaluable experience from the very cold climate in Alaska. Adam shared his extensive design build experience highlighting the business side of things and commercial projects, also PHIUS+ quality assured.

During the core conference Prudence spoke on the advantages of the WUFI Passive modeling tool. Graham Wright, board member of the PHNW and PHIUS senior scientist, presented on the current standard adaptation status by PHIUS and Building Science Corporation.

Special compliments go to Dan Whitmore, PHIUS certified builder/CPHC trainer and board member of PHNW: He was very much involved in putting together the schedule and presentations. Great work!

Again, it was a pleasure to be there, seeing so many friends and familiar faces. The progress is stunning and will hopefully inspire many all over the United States to follow in your footsteps!

Kat

 

PHIUS Certified Data for Windows program online

Graham Wright, who heads up the PHIUS Certified Data for Windows program, joins us today to provide clarifications on some key features of the program. And to clear up some misinformation.

I get and see online a lot of questions about the PHIUS Certified Data for Windows program, and how it differs from PHI’s Euro-centric program. Apologies—it’s clear that we haven’t communicated the program as well as we should have—but we are catching up to ourselves.

I’m happy to report that we’ve got data and climate recommendations for a nice range of windows online here.

The table lists products, climate zone recommendations, full data certificates and supporting THERM files.

There are a lot more coming—and we’ll be converting this static table to an online database soon.

For manufacturers and suppliers, we invite you to download a detailed description of the certification process (with an application form), and the document is also available at the program overview page.

In the meantime, I hope to clear up misconceptions and concerns about the program:

I heard that the PHIUS Certified Data for Windows program doesn’t account for whole-window R-value. Is that correct?

In fact, the program does provide recommendations based on whole-window R-value, and all have the force of criteria as far as manufacturers are concerned. Also the program provides recommendations / criteria on solar heat gain coefficient.  (They vary by climate from about R-5 to R-9.)

Why doesn’t the program address surface temperature factor (“fRsi”)?

Eventually, it probably will – but on the list of important future program improvements for North America, it’s pretty far down the list, after data publication, NFRC harmonization, air-tightness-durability, and Canadian Energy Rating. That’s partly because fRsi isn’t pertinent to hot climates (and there’s a lot of hot climate zone in North America), and we decided to pay more attention to solar heat gain coefficient.

We cover the condensation / fRsi issue by providing the THERM files, which allow consultants to calculate it if they wish, and more precisely, with respect to the expected interior humidity conditions for their particular project and climate. (I made an ASHRAE 160 + ISO 13788 calculator for computing fRsi requirements climate- and project- specifically. We make it available during CPHC training, and if you email me at graham@passivehouse.us, I’ll be happy to send it to you.)

Moreover, both the fRsi criterion and the single-height bar on U-value (at about R-7) look to be legacies of the single-zone origin of PHI’s window program.

Setting that high bar at R-7 has certainly spurred innovation. But our multi-zone system does the same thing – people want to “level up” from zone 3 to 4 or from 4 to 5.  A single standard, when it comes to windows, fails to inform a shopper whether a window is appropriate for a passive house project because it’s overkill in some places and under kill in others.

It also hurts manufacturers—many of them mainstream producers of very affordable windows—who, right now, offer windows that will work well in mild climates. Designers, builders and clients should have those options.

Moreover, we find much to admire in the NFRC system and would like to get the best of both worlds. Funding for such harmonization work is being applied for.

Do we really need the PHIUS window program?

Absolutely.

PHIUS’ window program is moving toward a critical goal: producing data in the format that passive house consultants need, and that enables direct comparison to windows rated by other EN-based outfits like PHI or say, IFT Rosenheim. Both window industry representatives and passive designers have told us this is critical if we want to energize the market. To be sure, the programs’ fundamentals are aligned, but the presentation and recommendation level is different in a number of ways. For example, PHIUS’ program is more fussy about solar heat gain and zone granularity. PHI’s is more fussy about horizontal / vertical.

At PHIUS we believe that passive house principles apply universally, but a single criterion does not. From their Greenbuild presentation, it was clear to me that PHI recognizes the need for climate-specific recommendations for components, including windows.  But as I understand it their window certification is still pass/fail at one level. PHIUS has moved more quickly on this front. Going forward, if you hear “this is a passive house window” people should know to ask:  for what climate?  Be wary of claims about passive house windows that don’t show any numbers or label or certificate, it might just be loose talk.

Why such a long name? Why not just PHIUS Certified Window, for example

We settled on the name with care. The AAMA or NFRC would say, you don’t have a “window certification program” unless you address air / water / structural issues. So PHIUS is not certifying windows (and neither does PHI by such lights).

We’re certifying certain data about windows, namely thermal performance, modeled. Hence, “PHIUS Certified Data for Window Performance Program.”

We did not include the term “passive house” because while designed with passive house in mind, the data—even for windows that don’t receive recommendations for passive application—will be extremely useful for designers.