Why PHIUS? Because Climate Specific Design = Quality Assurance

Why do you build to PHIUS Standards?

Asked at the 2017 North American Passive House Conference in Seattle, WA.

Lindsey Elton, ECO Achievers:  …E-L-T-O-N like Elton John…

I believe in PHIUS because the organization has taken an extremely detailed look according to our climate zone of what it takes to build a net-zero home or a net-zero building.

Peter Marciano, Legacy Buildings, New York, NY: I’ve come to the conclusion based on what I’ve built that there’s a lot of information out here. There are several passive house programs available. And, for me, having come to the realization that it has to be climate-specific because that’s what works. That’s what works in this nation. That’s what works in this country.

Marc Rosenbaum, EnergySmiths, West Tisbury, MA: I’ve been doing this for almost 40 years, and one of the things that PHIUS brings to the table here that are so amazing to me is people are interested in the actual performance of the buildings. They’re measuring them. They’re comparing them to what they thought they should do, and it’s a really terrific community that is sharing the information to make better buildings.

Elton: They’ve taken all the guesswork out, they’re doing the calculations, and they were smart about it. And we can employ this time after time after time again.

Marciano: If it’s not climate specific, I have had definite problems with certain aspects of my enclosure and certain aspects of my building. And I wouldn’t make that mistake again. I would definitely use a climate specific standard to establish… To build my next passive house.

Rosenbaum: And I think we all know why we’re doing it. We’re doing it because we care about the climate, we care about the kids, we care about other species besides ourselves. And we don’t talk about that. We talk about BTUs, and thermal bridges, and solar heat gain coefficients.

Elton: We’re firmly behind it, our company’s firmly behind it. We believe in it, and that’s why we’re here.

Rosenbaum: PHIUS has really created this community of people, who I think, care about each other’s learning, and share our successes and our failures, and it makes all of us better.

PHIUS+: The path to positive energy

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NFRC Calculations Now Accepted for PHIUS Verified Window Performance Data Program

Graham S. Wright, Senior Scientist & Product Program Manager

window overview page image

 

PHIUS is pleased to announce the addition of a new path to performance data verification within our PHIUS Verified Window Performance Data Program. Based on the calculation standards of the US-based National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC), this new compliance path offers an accurate and low-cost solution for manufacturers.

Previously in the PHIUS window program, window performance (U-value and solar heat gain coefficient) was only calculated based on European standards (EN/ ISO 10077-2 for frames/spacers, EN 673 for center-of-glass U-value, and EN 410 for solar heat gain.) Since the technical details of the EN standards differ from those of NFRC (which also have an ISO designation, ISO 15099), the performance numbers from the two methods could not be fairly compared. Although the technical sophistication of the EN and NFRC methods is similar, the actual NFRC labels give only whole-window properties for standard sizes and omit the component-level performance data needed by passive house modelers.

Now under the new program, domestic manufacturers who have already (or are currently pursuing) an NFRC rating can pursue this new calculation method in order to save time and money by avoiding additional calculation costs. The NFRC calculation method also allows performance numbers from North American products to be compared to those of European imports, thus giving passive house consultants and energy modelers performance numbers in a format that can be plugged directly into passive building modeling software WUFI Passive and the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP).

The “EN mode” of calculation will continue to be supported in the PHIUS window program. The EN method, referred to as “Orange Path”, is signified by an orange data label and noted in the border at the top of the label. As in the current program, pre-existing NFRC data files (for THERM and WINDOW) can serve as time-saving starting points for the EN-based calculations, but a significant amount of rework is needed due to the differences in method.

Orange Path data label, based on EN standards

Orange Path data label, based on EN standards

The label for the new “NFRC mode”, referred to as “Blue Path”, will have the same format and types of data listed as the EN mode label, but is signified by a blue data label. This path applies a conversion factor to the component-level data from the NFRC calculations.

Blue Path data label, based on NFRC standards

Blue Path data label, based on NFRC standards

PHIUS and NFRC jointly developed a program to train qualified NFRC simulators to run the proper conversion to produce the Blue Path data labels as an extension of their regular work on NFRC ratings. The conversion has two aspects – adjusting for the difference in standard window sizes, and for the different treatment of the extra heat loss at the edge of the glass due to the spacers. More details about the glass-edge translation can be found in a 2014 report entitled “NFRC and PHIUS U-factor Calculation Comparison” by Jeff Baker of WESTLab and NFRC. Verified product performance values are then provided to PHIUS by the NFRC modeler and published to the PHIUS Verified Window Performance Database.

PHIUS calculates the center-of-glass properties in a climate-dependent way, rather than using fixed environmental conditions, and incorporates climate-dependent recommendations on the data label. Since higher performance is required to get recommendations in more extreme climates, this provides “bragging rights” for manufacturers in addition to providing numbers for comparison-shopping and numbers for energy modeling.

For more information and to download the Program Overview and Program Application & Instructions in PDF, visit the PHIUS Verified Window Performance Data Program site. Find a qualified NFRC simulator here and submit your product for data verification today.

If you have any questions, please contact Graham Wright, Senior Scientist and Product Program Manager, at graham@passivehouse.us.

From Twin Countries to Twin Cities: China is Making Strides in Bringing Passive Building Mainstream

Katrin Klingenberg, PHIUS Executive Director

 

Passive House Alliance China’s 3rd China Passive Building Summit in Shanghai was followed up by a one-day expert meeting and workshop. The group rode out together to old town Shanghai, a nice area of the city consisting of mostly low-rise buildings. The fall weather had now finally turned a little nippy and drizzlier than the days before, and I was happy to have worn my jacket that day. Shanghai is unique: for two months out of the year (one each in the spring and fall), the temperatures are on the cool side, requiring no cooling and almost no heating, but the humidity is still too high to be comfortable.

The workshop was organized by Passive House Alliance China and took place onsite at a high-performance multifamily retrofit project located in a high-end gated community. Upon our arrival we were welcomed into a beautifully designed lobby where refreshments were being served to the invited stakeholders representing the construction industry and building science field from different cities in China. Following lunch, we had the opportunity to tour several of the completed high-performance apartments and begin to delve deeper into high-performance construction methods in mixed/humid climates with a focus on the cities in the Yangtze Delta. The main focus was on large-scale multifamily buildings, a rather typical and ubiquitous building typology throughout China.

If China and the US are country climate twins, then Shanghai is a close twin to Houston’s southeast Texas climate with the exception that Shanghai gets a little bit more rainfall. The most important challenges for passive design space conditioning solutions in these cities are not the thermal loads – it’s the humidity! Thermal loads are easily reduced to very low peaks by using passive design strategies such as moderate amounts of insulation (4 inches of mineral wool for a larger scale buildings will suffice), balanced ventilation with very good energy recovery efficiencies, excellent windows (double pane with thermally-broken frames), and passive level airtightness. But the high humidity load from ventilation during summer and the shoulder seasons can only be reduced so far. A significant dehumidification load remains, often during seasons when little or no cooling is required, as was the case while we were in China.

Improvements to the building envelope to minimize heating and cooling peaks also effects the ratio of sensible to latent cooling loads – resulting in the latent load becoming equal to or larger than the sensible load. While in less efficient buildings the sensible load far exceeds the latent load and can be taken care of by traditional cooling equipment, in highly efficient passive buildings it is the latent load that is now equal to or even dominant (see examples from Beijing and Hong Kong in the graphs below). This poses a new challenge for low-load comfort systems.

sensible-heat-ratio

The graphs illustrate how the sensible heat ratio decreases if the building envelope is improved for the climates of Beijing and Hong Kong. (slide credit: Hartwig Kuenzel, Fraunhofer IBP, NAPHC2015 keynote)

Climate specific targets also matter a great deal in this climate. In mixed climates, the right balance between heating and cooling targets becomes critical to avoid over-insulation and overheating risks. Window performance in mixed/humid climates needs to strike the right balance as well in order to not inadvertently increase cooling loads. Windows need to be optimized for both cases, heating and cooling, to perform at their best. In the climate of Shanghai as mentioned previously, good double pane windows with a lower solar heat gain coefficient and thermally broken frames are typically the right choice to meet comfort targets and to avoid contributing to overheating. Accurate assessment of internal gains must take into account culture, lifestyle, occupancy, and other factors as they have a significant impact on the overall energy balance of high-performance passive buildings.

In the case of China for example, cooking plays a major role in the vibrant Chinese lifestyle and culture, as we were lucky enough to experience first hand as our gracious hosts showed us the best and most interesting dining spots around Shanghai. Food is central to the culture and if folks are cooking a lot of flavorful and spiced foods in their homes in a climate with significant cooling loads, they will want directly vented kitchen exhaust hoods! Grease, odors, and heat need to get captured and thrown out right at the source. I was impressed to see a novel solution to this problem as we toured the retrofitted apartments. Each unit had two kitchens: one being the “real kitchen” with the big stove, prep area, and fridges which were separated from the main living space by sliding doors to minimize the negative indoor air impacts on the rest of the apartment, and the other one adjacent was an open kitchen concept with a bar for entertaining! What a brilliant idea (if you can afford it)!

Now, what about energy modeling? We have often said that more complex climates really should be modeled using dynamic whole building energy balancing tools such as WUFI Plus. What makes the climate more “complex”? Cooling and dehumidification is needed when the exterior temperature gets closer to the interior comfort zone and begins to fluctuate around it. The warm season is dominated by diurnally reversing heat and moisture flows – in during the cooler nighttime, and out during warmer daytime temperatures. Add moisture into this back and forth and it becomes really complex. To be able to accurately predict how components and the whole building will perform from an energy and hygrothermal perspective, the designer really needs to perform a dynamic whole-building energy model based on hourly data to make the right choices. In contrast, in a heating dominated climate, exterior temperatures are swinging far enough away from the interior thermal comfort zone so that heat and moisture flows are mostly flowing out. Static models are accurate enough for simpler climates such as this.

The graphs illustrate conditions for both heating and cooling/mixed climates. The static monthly balance method as employed by WUFI Passive is sufficiently accurate to predict energy use in a heating dominated climate. In cooling/mixed climates such as Shanghai and Houston, dynamic whole-building energy simulation (WUFI Plus) is recommended. (slide credit: Hartwig Kuenzel, Fraunhofer IBP, NAPHC2015 keynote)

The graphs illustrate conditions for both heating and cooling/mixed climates. The static monthly balance method as employed by WUFI Passive is sufficiently accurate to predict energy use in a heating dominated climate. In cooling/mixed climates such as Shanghai and Houston, dynamic whole-building energy simulation (WUFI Plus) is recommended. (slide credit: Hartwig Kuenzel, Fraunhofer IBP, NAPHC2015 keynote)

Hygrothermal wall performance checks should be best practice for passive designs in mixed/humid climates to avoid any kind of condensation risk. As China ramps up their energy efficiency efforts in varying climates to near passive building levels and experiments with materials it will be critical that these models are created as project teams might not be familiar with just yet or have no long term experience with this risk management in mixed/humid climates, which can lead to critical and significant failures.

Now, what about the high-performance apartment tour, where are the Chinese at with their high-performance solutions today?

I was thoroughly impressed with what they had already in place in terms of execution, performance, details, mechanical solutions, and – to top it all off – a standardized monitoring interface centrally located in the home providing constant feedback on thermal comfort and indoor air quality to the home owner including fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) and inside to outside air quality comparisons. In Shanghai it is often the case that outdoor conditions are worse than indoors due to high pollution levels.

The project we toured was a retrofitted five-story brick building that had been upgraded by adding a 4-inch layer of mineral wool exterior insulation, airtight layer, and a new clay tile façade. The reported tested air-tightness result was 1.5 ACH, which is very respectable for a retrofit! Space conditioning was solved in a very elegant and most comfortable way: a separate energy recovery balanced ventilation system with appropriate filtration and dedicated integrated dehumidification took care of controlling ventilation humidity loads and outdoor pollutants (as evidenced on the screen of the monitoring interface in the living room, see opening photo). Space conditioning was handled by a separate point source solution consisting of hydronic heating and cooling integrated into the room’s ceiling. Radiant heating and cooling is a more costly, yet very comfortable high-end solution. Controlled infiltration and humidity loads are key to this solution to avoid condensation. So is awareness by the homeowner. They need to be put on notice that they can’t cool the home and leave the beautiful lift and slide high-performance balcony door open at the same time!

The developer reported that the passive house approach works financially for them for the high-end market. As you might expect, two bedroom apartments were selling in the millions, as would be the case for similar real estate in any other cosmopolitan global city.

Can passive go mainstream in China?

If I may offer my personal prediction: the Chinese have taken a surprising global lead in fighting climate change and have identified aggressive conservation goals for buildings as a valid strategy. The government has passed mandates to local jurisdictions to find appropriate cost effective solutions. If China addresses the cost optimization of passive building measures based on varying climates, construction paradigms, and energy costs in China similarly to what PHIUS did in the US, then they should certainly be able to generate design guidelines aimed at presenting the most economical path to zero. At the rate that they are going, I believe China will bring passive building to the mainstream before he US does because they have the political will, effective materials and components, knowledge of building science and energy modeling, and cost effectiveness strategies to get there.

What about the state of typical mainstream construction in China?

From what we saw, most apartments in Shanghai already have their own air-to-air heating and cooling heat pump unit sitting on their balcony. Pair that common solution with good airtightness, balanced energy recovery with dedicated dehumidification, moderate amounts of insulation and appropriate hygrothermal wall design, good windows, and you are there.

It would be great to see China taking the lead!

 

– Katrin

PHIUS Travels to Shanghai to Keynote Passive House Alliance China’s 3rd Passive Building Summit

Katrin Klingenberg, PHIUS Executive Director

Developing Partnerships and Fostering Collaboration to Bring Climate-Specific Passive Building Standards to China

china-ph-conference-intro

The 3rd China Passive Building Summit took place in Shanghai Oct. 27-28, 2016.

This year I was invited to give the keynote address at Passive House Alliance China’s 3rd China Passive Building Summit in Shanghai, with the explicit request to report on passive building progress in the US and on PHIUS’ climate-specific standards.

In light of the immense amount of development currently taking place in China, with whole cities springing up practically overnight and a huge stock of existing buildings in need of energy efficiency upgrades, China’s interest in the passive building work being done in the US is significant.

It is expected that by 2030, a large amount of buildings will be newly constructed or retrofitted worldwide that will be equivalent to about 60% of the building stock that currently exists today worldwide. Thus it is crucial that these buildings, whether they be new construction or retrofits, perform at very high levels, ideally at zero energy or zero carbon performance thresholds, in order to tackle the challenges of global climate change. A large portion of this new construction activity will occur in China and India.

As I arrived in Shanghai a few weeks ago, my first impression on the way into downtown was “Wow, this is a really big place.” In fact, it is the largest “city proper” in the world. Shanghai consists of a conglomeration of countless high-rise residential subdivisions that emerge soon after leaving the airport and continue to expand along the hour-long ride into downtown. The implications of building on this scale came into focus again later that evening as I was at the hotel battling the jetlag of an 11-hour time difference following a 14-hour flight, when I heard the breaking news: the UN had just announced that 2016 is the first year on record that CO2 levels in the atmosphere not only hit 400 ppm, but that those levels have been sustained on average throughout the entire year. Needless to say, this is a threshold with serious consequences that will take a long time to reverse, and as you know, much of that CO2 comes from operating buildings.

climate-spec-usa-china

A recent study prepared by the Global Building Performance Network (GBPN) in Paris investigated passive buildings worldwide as a necessary solution to the climate challenge. For more information about the GBPN studies, you may view the reports at http://www.gbpn.org/reports

China is a big country, approximately the geographic size of the US, and has a significant diversity of climates, many of them very similar to the US. As such, and with well over 4 times the population of the US, the country’s building community shows great interest in PHIUS’ climate-specific passive building standards. A recent study prepared by the Global Building Performance Network (GBPN) in Paris investigated low-load high-performance buildings (ie. passive buildings) worldwide as a necessary solution to the climate challenge. For this study the GBPN developed a low-load space conditioning needs map (see image at right) which shows that the low-load systems profile (different combinations of heating, cooling and dehumidification requirements depending on climate) of the US looks almost identical to China. With such close similarities between the climates of the US and China, the implementation of our methodology for developing climate-specific passive building standards in China is a logical next step.

The 3rd Passive Building Summit was well organized and well attended, bringing in about 500 participants and a host of great presentations during the opening plenary followed by excellent technical sessions. On the day following my keynote, I participated in a technical workshop to assess how to facilitate continued collaboration between PHIUS and the Passive House Alliance China group going forward. We agreed that the applicability of the climate-specific passive building standards adapted from the US to the Chinese context is a no-brainer, however more work will still need to be done, such as developing metrics to incorporate local cost data for the best cost-optimized results.

We concluded the workshop with the Chinese passive building group in agreement to pursue further collaboration going forward and that PHIUS’ role in that collaboration would be to help generate Chinese climate-specific passive building standards using the same methodology used for the DOE/NREL report. In this arrangement, our Chinese partners would provide all the necessary information and parameters needed to run the calculations. As a first step on this front we have already generated the climate data set for Guangzhou for the first project enrolled for PHIUS+ 2015 certification.

Please stay tuned for more information on further developments with this promising new partnership as we look forward to tackling the challenges of climate change together.

 

– Katrin

Climate Data and PHIUS+ 2015

 

Adam2smAdam Cohen is a principal at Passiv Science in Roanoke, Va, a PHIUS CPHC®, a PHIUS Builder Training instructor, the builder/developer of multiple successful passive building projects, and a member of the PHIUS Technical Committee. With the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 climate-specific standard, Adam weighs in on the importance of climate data sets.

Project teams have always needed to be discerning about climate data sets they use in energy modeling.  Whether it’s WUFI Passive, Energy Plus, PHPP or any other software, the old adage garbage in = garbage out applies. Project teams always must analyze and make a call as to how accurate the climate file is.

For example, I worked on a Houston, Texas project a number of years ago and there were several climate datasets that were close and one that was very different. As a team, we had to decide how to approach this in the most logical and reasoned way.

Recently as I analyzed a Michigan project, I determined that my two dataset choices were “just not feeling exactly right” so I asked PHIUS’ Lisa White and Graham Wright to generate a custom set. I can’t know that this one is exactly right, but I know that it’s as accurate and “right” as we can make it.

Note that when multiple data sets are candidates, it is not just altitude that matters, but location of weather station (roof, ground, behind a shed, etc.). Ryan Abendroth blogged on the subject of selecting data sets (and when to consider having a custom dataset generated) and I recommend you give his post a read.

Since PHIUS+ 2015 is a climate specific standard, it’s all the more important to use the best available.  We all know that bad data is not exclusive to PHIUS (remember the Seattle weather debacle in early versions of the PHPP).

It’s incumbent on project teams to use science, reason and judgment in interpreting climate data sets. Being on the water, in the middle of a field or in the tarmac of an airport makes a difference.

In New York City, for example, we have an oddity: There are three dataset location choices.

A satellite photo of NYC with Central Park outlined. The climate date for the Park is substantially different than that for other parts of the city.

A satellite photo of NYC with Central Park outlined.

One is Central Park, and the PHIUS+ 2015 targets for that are substantially different than the others. But, counter to a Tweet calling into question the validity of the PHIUS+ NYC target numbers, they are different because the Central Park climate data is substantially different – probably due to vegetation countering the urban heat island effect. It has a dramatic and pretty fascinating effect on the microclimate, and the U.S. DOE has a nice read on the subject.

For project teams lucky enough to have access to multiple data sets for their location, by rational comparison, they should be able to make an intelligent decision to use a canned set or to have a custom set generated.

It also more important than ever that the PHIUS+ certifiers to examine the weather data provided by a project teams to see if the project team made a logical, rather then an easy selection of climate data.

In addition, we on the PHIUS Technical Committee will continue to collect and monitor data and will tweak certification protocols as we see the need. But, I remind all my fellow CPHCs that bad climate data sets are endemic in the industry and it is important that project teams make careful decisions and that they reach out to PHIUS staff to help when climate data sets just don’t seem right.