Tierra Linda Brings Affordable Passive Housing to Chicago

Some forward-thinking architects and community groups have partnered with PHIUS to bring the benefits of passive building to the affordable housing market in Chicago.

Landon Bone Baker Architects (LBBA) and the Latin United Community Housing Association (LUCHA) held a public tour of the Tierra Linda passive house project on Wed., June 20. The tour drew a crowd of nearly 150 architects, designers, writers and curious neighbors.

While the project is well under way and set to be completed in October, city regulations nearly thwarted the idea in its early stages.

“Initially the city was skeptical about the passive house design,” said LBBA architect Dominik Soltys, “but once we explained to them what it would mean for the community then they were more receptive.”

IMG_0931-2

Other homes in the housing project are Energy Star rated, a more relaxed rating than the PHIUS+ certification, but cheaper upfront. ComEd will be monitoring the energy usage on the passive building against the Energy Star buildings to evaluate and compare actual energy performance.

The adoption of passive building design is growing exponentially in the affordable housing sector, with some states having already included passive building certification as part of their process of awarding tax credits for affordable projects.

According the the United States Federal Reserve, one in two renters in the City of Chicago is rent burdened, meaning that more than 30 percent of their income is spent on housing costs such as rent, utilities and repairs. Passive building is a perfect match for affordable projects, because it significantly reduces and attunes utility bills.

The 6-flat PHIUS+ certified building is located at 1812 N Drake Ave., in the center of a scattered development site in Chicago’s West Side. If all goes according to plan, the Tierra Linda project will be the first PHIUS+ certified multifamily  building in the state of Illinois. Before residents can move in, for quality assurance purposes, third-party PHIUS+ raters and verifiers will perform tests on the building to ensure that it is airtight and able to maintain a healthy air quality.

Lindsey Elton, Director of Rating Services at Eco Achievers, is in charge of testing the Tierra Linda project. During the tour, the PHIUS+ rater said she is excited for the future of passive building, and looking forward to being a part of this affordable housing project.

“We’re growing, PHIUS is growing. We’re pushing the envelope, no pun intended,” said Elton. “Your path to net zero is a part of our conversation.”

Why PHIUS? To Be Part of the Solution

Some inspirations from the Seattle conference to kick off 2018

At PHIUS, we’ve been at this passive building business for a good long while. And we’ve been inspired to see so, so many professionals join and build our community. Every year we’re all so busy that it’s pretty hard to find the time to just talk about why we’re all doing what we do. That’s why each conference is such a blast.

To capture a little of that fun–and inspiration–we asked a question of some attendees at the 2017 North American Passive House Conference in Seattle, Washington. The question:

Why do you build to PHIUS standards?

Here are some answers and comments we received–we hope you can relate to one or more of them, and please feel free to chip in your own answers in the comments section.

Elizabeth Correa, LMN Architects, Seattle: I design to PHIUS standards because it was a standard that allowed me to align my principles, my design principles, and ethical principles.

 

Sam Rodell, Rodell.Design, Spokane, Washinton: Building to the PHIUS standard is, I would say, our practice considers that to be our baseline and I think that anyone who builds today and does not consider the possibilities of what is happening here with building science wanders around in a dangerous territory of what I would consider to be professional negligence.

 

Lindsay Schack, Love | Schack Architecture, Bozeman, Montana/ Driggs, Idaho: I found PHIUS when I was researching affordable and high-performance wall assemblies for a client of mine. And once I found out about PHIUS, I went down this rabbit hole of learning building science, and now I can’t go back. I can’t, with good conscience, build to code anymore. I have to push farther.

 

Doug Farr, Farr Associates, Chicago, Illinois: Our practice is devoted to sustainability. We’re architects and we are striving to achieve PHIUS+ on a couple of projects, one is a new build and one is a rehabilitation. It’s challenging and frankly, that’s why I like it.

Schack: PHIUS, the institute, not only provides you with support and knowledge, it provides you with camaraderie, and I’ve learned from great professionals, and it has pushed my projects to a level that is gaining notice in my industry and where I live.

Correa: And that marriage between building science and architecture through PHIUS has made me passionate about architecture again and passionate about our mission to address the problems of climate change.

Farr: Some of the other systems which are also worthy and ambitious also are hard to do, but they all have what Kat always calls a ‘get out of jail free card,’ which is that you can always compensate for building a less efficient building by adding more PV or renewable energy.

Correa: And I realize that buildings being a large percentage of the carbon emissions problem and I don’t wanna be part of the problem. That is why PHIUS is especially important to me.

Farr: Passive House is the gold standard.

Correa: I’m part of the solution and I’m not any longer part of the problem.

PHIUS+: The path to positive energy

Become a PHIUS+ Professional and be a leader in the industry

 

Why PHIUS? Because Climate Specific Design = Quality Assurance

Why do you build to PHIUS Standards?

Asked at the 2017 North American Passive House Conference in Seattle, WA.

Lindsey Elton, ECO Achievers:  …E-L-T-O-N like Elton John…

I believe in PHIUS because the organization has taken an extremely detailed look according to our climate zone of what it takes to build a net-zero home or a net-zero building.

Peter Marciano, Legacy Buildings, New York, NY: I’ve come to the conclusion based on what I’ve built that there’s a lot of information out here. There are several passive house programs available. And, for me, having come to the realization that it has to be climate-specific because that’s what works. That’s what works in this nation. That’s what works in this country.

Marc Rosenbaum, EnergySmiths, West Tisbury, MA: I’ve been doing this for almost 40 years, and one of the things that PHIUS brings to the table here that are so amazing to me is people are interested in the actual performance of the buildings. They’re measuring them. They’re comparing them to what they thought they should do, and it’s a really terrific community that is sharing the information to make better buildings.

Elton: They’ve taken all the guesswork out, they’re doing the calculations, and they were smart about it. And we can employ this time after time after time again.

Marciano: If it’s not climate specific, I have had definite problems with certain aspects of my enclosure and certain aspects of my building. And I wouldn’t make that mistake again. I would definitely use a climate specific standard to establish… To build my next passive house.

Rosenbaum: And I think we all know why we’re doing it. We’re doing it because we care about the climate, we care about the kids, we care about other species besides ourselves. And we don’t talk about that. We talk about BTUs, and thermal bridges, and solar heat gain coefficients.

Elton: We’re firmly behind it, our company’s firmly behind it. We believe in it, and that’s why we’re here.

Rosenbaum: PHIUS has really created this community of people, who I think, care about each other’s learning, and share our successes and our failures, and it makes all of us better.

PHIUS+: The path to positive energy

Become a PHIUS+ Professional and be a leader in the industry

Why PHIUS+? Science, Climate, Energy Modeling

 

Why do you build to PHIUS Standards?

Asked at the 2017 North American Passive House Conference in Seattle, WA.

“As opposed to building standard code buildings?”
—Nichole Schuster, Ashley McGraw (Syracuse, NY)

“The question really is, how do we respond to climate change in the buildings that we build?”
—James Geppner, Big Yellow Cab (Cold Spring, NY)

Schuster: “I design to PHIUS+ standards because it’s an intensely rigorous energy efficiency standard.

Geppner: “And if we’re gonna respond, then, we need something that’s science-based and we need something that’s performance-based.

It doesn’t just have one component or another, but it actually performs to a certain level. And that that performance is measurable.”

“My passion is using the best technology and the best in building science to model energy use in buildings and to improve building efficiency.”
—Maren Longhurst, Rodell Design (Spokane, Washington)

Geppner: “It’s one way to achieve basically, a building that requires very little energy and does so and produces a high indoor quality.”

Schuster: “I think it provides greater levels of resiliency. I think it’s tailored to our specific climates that we get the maximum benefit out of it, and it can also help us achieve other standards and goals like the Living Building Challenge, Energy Petal, for example.”

Geppner: “Part of what makes it the best is that it uses what I think of, or what I call the dynamic energy model.

Longhurst: “PHIUS provides software Wi-Fi Passive and Wi-Fi Plus that really get deep into the details of a project.”

Geppner: “The information that goes into designing a building is information from that region. It’s weather data, it’s climate data, so that when you have a house, it’s not thoughtlessly constructed, it’s constructed to the temperature of that region, the moisture of that region.”

Longhurst: “And allow us to predict what a project will do and help us to design that project to be the most efficient, and the most comfortable, and the best quality building.

Geppner: “An option to get away from a construction method—which there’s basically no technology, it’s kind of a 400-year old process—to something that’s more like the thinking and the modeling that goes behind constructing something like an iPhone, or a high technology product, and it works.”

 

PHIUS+: The path to positive energy

Become a PHIUS+ Professional and be a leader in the industry

 

NFRC Calculations Now Accepted for PHIUS Verified Window Performance Data Program

Graham S. Wright, Senior Scientist & Product Program Manager

window overview page image

 

PHIUS is pleased to announce the addition of a new path to performance data verification within our PHIUS Verified Window Performance Data Program. Based on the calculation standards of the US-based National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC), this new compliance path offers an accurate and low-cost solution for manufacturers.

Previously in the PHIUS window program, window performance (U-value and solar heat gain coefficient) was only calculated based on European standards (EN/ ISO 10077-2 for frames/spacers, EN 673 for center-of-glass U-value, and EN 410 for solar heat gain.) Since the technical details of the EN standards differ from those of NFRC (which also have an ISO designation, ISO 15099), the performance numbers from the two methods could not be fairly compared. Although the technical sophistication of the EN and NFRC methods is similar, the actual NFRC labels give only whole-window properties for standard sizes and omit the component-level performance data needed by passive house modelers.

Now under the new program, domestic manufacturers who have already (or are currently pursuing) an NFRC rating can pursue this new calculation method in order to save time and money by avoiding additional calculation costs. The NFRC calculation method also allows performance numbers from North American products to be compared to those of European imports, thus giving passive house consultants and energy modelers performance numbers in a format that can be plugged directly into passive building modeling software WUFI Passive and the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP).

The “EN mode” of calculation will continue to be supported in the PHIUS window program. The EN method, referred to as “Orange Path”, is signified by an orange data label and noted in the border at the top of the label. As in the current program, pre-existing NFRC data files (for THERM and WINDOW) can serve as time-saving starting points for the EN-based calculations, but a significant amount of rework is needed due to the differences in method.

Orange Path data label, based on EN standards

Orange Path data label, based on EN standards

The label for the new “NFRC mode”, referred to as “Blue Path”, will have the same format and types of data listed as the EN mode label, but is signified by a blue data label. This path applies a conversion factor to the component-level data from the NFRC calculations.

Blue Path data label, based on NFRC standards

Blue Path data label, based on NFRC standards

PHIUS and NFRC jointly developed a program to train qualified NFRC simulators to run the proper conversion to produce the Blue Path data labels as an extension of their regular work on NFRC ratings. The conversion has two aspects – adjusting for the difference in standard window sizes, and for the different treatment of the extra heat loss at the edge of the glass due to the spacers. More details about the glass-edge translation can be found in a 2014 report entitled “NFRC and PHIUS U-factor Calculation Comparison” by Jeff Baker of WESTLab and NFRC. Verified product performance values are then provided to PHIUS by the NFRC modeler and published to the PHIUS Verified Window Performance Database.

PHIUS calculates the center-of-glass properties in a climate-dependent way, rather than using fixed environmental conditions, and incorporates climate-dependent recommendations on the data label. Since higher performance is required to get recommendations in more extreme climates, this provides “bragging rights” for manufacturers in addition to providing numbers for comparison-shopping and numbers for energy modeling.

For more information and to download the Program Overview and Program Application & Instructions in PDF, visit the PHIUS Verified Window Performance Data Program site. Find a qualified NFRC simulator here and submit your product for data verification today.

If you have any questions, please contact Graham Wright, Senior Scientist and Product Program Manager, at graham@passivehouse.us.