Transitioning from PHIUS+ to the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard

Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

 

Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

Certification Update: PHIUS will not accept PHPP v9 for PHIUS+ 2015 Project Certification

Up until now, Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) has allowed project teams pursuing PHIUS+ Certification to use one of two passive house modeling tools to model their projects: 1) WUFI® Passive, the passive building modeling software developed by Fraunhofer IBP in collaboration with PHIUS and Owens Corning, and 2) Passive House Planning Package (PHPP), the passive house modeling tool developed by the Passivhaus Institut (PHI). However going forward PHIUS will not be accepting the latest version of PHPP v9 for PHIUS+ 2015 project certification.

Since the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard in March of 2015, PHIUS’ standard now differs significantly from the PHI standard. Specifically, the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard uses climate-specific targets for space conditioning energy use (the first such passive building standard to do so), limits overall energy use for residential buildings on a per person basis (rather than a square footage basis), and now uses a different metric for air infiltration.

For the first six months after the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard went live, project teams could elect to pursue either the earlier PHIUS+ Standard or the new PHIUS+ 2015 Standard. All new projects registered after September of 2015 are required to pursue certification under the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard.

 

Modeling Tools for Certification

Since the release of WUFI Passive in 2012, PHIUS has stopped teaching PHPP software during Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC®) training and began exclusively teaching passive building energy modeling with WUFI Passive. PHIUS has since trained over 1,100 building professionals in the WUFI Passive software to date. In conjunction with the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard, Fraunhofer released WUFI Passive v3.0, which includes a “PHIUS+ 2015 mode”. This software is uniquely suited to PHIUS+ 2015 projects, the North American passive building market, and is available for free on the Fraunhofer website.

Previously, project teams could use either WUFI Passive or PHPP for PHIUS+ project certification, and PHIUS continued to accept both modeling tools even after the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 standard. However, this was not without extra effort from the PHIUS project reviewers, as each PHPP submitted for PHIUS+ 2015 certification required a bit of “jury-rigging” in order to verify compliance with the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard. This adds time, and likely an extra layer of confusion, to the certification process.

In October 2015, the PHI released PHPP v9[1]. While this new software offers a variety of updates and new calculation protocols, PHIUS feels this software is no longer appropriate to verify compliance with the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard. As these two passive building standards diverge, the verification software also suitably continues to diverge. This ultimately does not come down to which software is “better”, but rather is simply about which software tool is most appropriate for each standard.

PHIUS will continue to accept earlier versions of PHPP for PHIUS+ 2015 certification, from the “06-02-10” IP overlay of the 2007 PHPP up through PHPPv8.5, but will not accept PHPP v9 for PHIUS+2015 certification. Eventually PHIUS will only be accepting WUFI Passive for modeling of PHIUS+ 2015 projects, but the date for this has not yet been determined.

For project teams with completed PHPPs that would like to transition over to WUFI WUFI logoPassive, PHIUS is offering a new service for a “one-time conversion” of your project from PHPP to WUFI Passive. The flat fee of $1000 for this service also includes the creation of a SketchUp file for the building and a walk-through of the completed model with PHIUS Certification staff. Contact certification@passivehouse.us for more information.

If you are a CPHC who has been meaning to venture into the world of WUFI Passive, PHIUS offers WUFI Passive training programs at various locations throughout the year to help get you up to speed on creating your own models in the software. Visit the WUFI Passive Training page for more information and to register for upcoming trainings.

Lastly, keep in mind that modeling tools are a small (albeit integral) part of the big picture. Try not to lose sight of the overall goal, which is to build energy efficient and resilient buildings that help to reduce the carbon footprint of the built environment. Regardless of your program preference, every step toward these goals is a step in the right direction.

 

[1] PHI allows project teams to pursue certification under previous iterations of their passive house standard as well as earlier versions of PHPP. However PHI’s new PER metric (the PE metric was used previously) requires using PHPP v9, the only version of the software able to calculate this. Thus PHPP v9 is not yet required for all projects; a sunset date for older versions of the standard and software has not yet been determined. For more information, see the “Criteria for the Passive House, EnerPHit and PHI Low Energy Building Standard” document on PHI’s website.

 

 

About WUFI Passive 

WUFI Passive is a powerful modeling program that dramatically improves the quality and efficiency of the passive building design process for Certified Passive House Consultants (CPHC®). The software allows for calculation of both static passive building energy modeling, as well as dynamic energy modeling for comfort and hygrothermal analysis. The user-friendly interface allows for SketchUp & Revit import, incorporates a seamless toggle between SI-IP, and generates high quality results reports for communication with clients and the PHIUS Certification team. Learn more at the WUFI website.

 

About the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard 

Developed in cooperation with Building Science Corporation under a US Department of Energy grant, the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard is the first and only passive building standard based upon climate-specific comfort and performance criteria aimed at presenting an affordable solution to achieving the most durable, resilient, energy-efficient building possible for a specific location. PHIUS+ 2015 is also the only passive building standard on the market that requires onsite QA/QC for certification.

Buildings designed and built to the PHIUS standard consume 86% less energy for heating and 46% less energy for cooling (depending on climate zone and building type) when compared to a code-compliant building (International Energy Conservation Code IECC 2009), resulting in an overall site Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of approximately 10-20 kBTU/ft2 year.

Multi-Family Passive Building: The Next Frontier Is Here!

Our blogger today is Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager. Lisa’s got an exciting update on the growth of PHIUS-certified multi-family projects.

Over the past year, we’ve seen some incredible multi-family project submissions in PHIUS+ Certification. Projects have ranged from duplexes to large affordable apartment complexes to an 84-unit YMCA retrofit.

To date, 21 multi-family projects have been submitted for PHIUS Certification; four are fully certified, four pre-certified and under construction, and the remaining in the pipeline. In terms of units, this equates to 331 total units submitted, 18 certified, and 168 pre-certified. These projects are spread through eight states, with some hot spots in New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, D.C., and California.

An underlying theme of these multi-family projects is that they are being built at little to no additional cost compared to a conventional building. The passive house community has discovered and implemented the economics of multi-family passive building. Larger buildings have a geometric advantage — increased ratio of floor area to envelope area relative to single family homes. This means more habitable space, and less envelope area to worry about transmission losses/gains. There are big incentives to invest in the envelope and cut out the large, expensive mechanical systems.

Additionally, affordable housing developments and non-profit organizations like Habitat for Humanity have taken an interest in passive building in order to benefit their tenants with electric bills that are a fraction of the typical cost.

Some exciting projects:

  1. Stellar Apartments: The first PHIUS+ Certified affordable multi-family project, 6-units, in Eugene, Ore. This project was constructed simultaneously with an almost identical 6-unit project, built to Energy Star/Earth Advantage Certification. The buildings are planned to be a comparison case study to evaluate the long term economics of both methods. CPHCs: Jan Fillinger and Win Swafford.
  2. The Orchards at Orenco: The largest pre-certified passive building in the United States. This 57-unit affordable housing complex is in Hillsboro, Ore., and is currently under construction. CPHC: Dylan Lamar.
  3. 424 Melrose: This 24-unit affordable complex was completed in Bushwick, N.Y., in February 2014, and is now occupied. Some units were set aside for handicapped residents while others set aside for those making well below the city’s median income. CPHC: Chris Benedict
  4. McKeesport Downtown Housing: This multi-phase retrofit project was on a YMCA originally built in 1922 in downtown McKeesport, PA for those at risk for homelessness. This project underwent the retrofit while half occupied at all times, and is the first pre-certified multi-unit retrofit project. CPHC: Michael Whartnaby.
  5. Uptown Lofts: This 24-unit affordable apartment complex planned for Pittsburgh, Pa., will be constructed simultaneously with an almost identical 23-unit project, built to code energy standards. The buildings are planned to be a comparison case study to evaluate the long term economics of both methods. CPHC: Morgan Law.
  6. Kiln Apartments: Completed in Portland, Ore., in June 2014, this 19-unit project remains one of the largest pre-certified projects, with commercial space on the street level. CPHC: David Posada.
  7. Delta Commons at Benning Road: This 13-unit retrofit project in Washington, D.C. is scheduled to begin construction in early fall 2014. As an exterior insulation retrofit, this project presents some unique challenges with an existing basement. CPHC: Michael Hindle.
  8. Sunshine Terrace Boarding Home: This almost complete boarding home in Spokane, Wash.,  features 29 semi-private units, 58 beds. This boarding home is part of the 7-acre Sunshine Health Facilities campus, and was built to expand the capacity of the assisted living facilities. CPHC: Sam Rodell.
  9. Canon Perdido Condos: This is the first pre-certified multi-family Habitat for Humanity project. Part of a 12 townhome development, this 3-unit building is under construction in Santa Barbara, CA and will be completed soon. CPHC: Edward DeVicente.

If you want to join in the multifamily boomlet, we’ve got a couple learning opportunities coming up.

First, we have partnered with Heartland Alliance, a non-profit group that — among its many good works — develops and manages affordable housing. We’ll present a three-hour introductory Multi-Family Workshop. I will be presenting along with PHIUS Executive Director Katrin Klingenberg. Details and registration will be live soon, meantime, save the date:

August 15
The Heartland Alliance
208 S. LaSalle, 13th floor conference room
Chicago, Ill.

If you want to receive details on the program when they’re available, provide your contact information here.

Second, we’ll offer an intensive full day pre-conference session at the 9th Annual North American Passive House Conference.

Accomplished CPHCs–who have built multifamily projects–will share their experiences and lessons learned. For more information, visit the pre conference schedule at the conference site. And register soon to get the early bird rate!

 

 

 

 

California here we come!

I’m just back from San Francisco where I spent five days to meet with stakeholders and contributors to discuss plans for the conference coming up on September 10-14, 2014.

The talks were amazing and super encouraging! PHIUS+ projects in the Bay Area are exceptional – they all are also zero energy or positive energy buildings highlighting that passive building is the ideal starting point for going zero or positive. This growing trend – passive to positive energy — will be one of the major themes for conference sessions!

Combining passive design in buildings plus renewables is one of the strategies identified by carbon reduction groups to help mitigate and adapt to climate change. The latter because passive buildings are especially resilient in weather extremes and power outages.

San Francisco has long been aiming at carbon zero goals by 2020, looking to identify a clear set of tools on how to practically and cost effectively implement them. That’s why we chose San Francisco for this 9th Annual North American Passive House Conference. We think it can be the catalyst for a tipping point, a special moment in time when the concept is catapulted forward thanks to favorable factors in the Bay Area. With plenty of high quality high-performance projects designed and built by the pioneers in the passive community, we have an excellent opportunity to make the case to make to the city and its residents that passive design is the best path to their goals.

On my trip I have spoken with various stakeholders and thought leaders and have seen nothing but honest excitement about the possibilities of the conferencce. And better yet, if San Francisco get’s it, you know that the rest of the state and then the country will eventually follow, hence it is critical to make this a big success that radiates beyond the borders of California setting a definite sign: we are in the transition toward a new energy economy and buildings, passive and renewables will play an important role in it.

We’re excited that William Rose, a building science pioneer, will deliver our keynote and that Achilles Karagiozis, Director of Building Science for Owens Corning and WUFI developer will speak at the closing plenary. Also: Joe Lstiburek will present a daylong workshop on building science fundamentals during pre-conference sessions.

Of course, success of the conference – as always –will depend on the dedicated members of our community. We’ve collected dozens and dozens of terrific presentation proposals (and we’re a week or two behind in our review, please accept our apologies; we’ll be in touch soon), and the content of our breakouts will be terrific, as always. We also have a great range of pre-conference sessions (which als earn CPHC CEUs), including a daylong session with five CPHCs who are leading the way in multifamily builldings. Visit the conference website often for updates.

And if you’re available to volunteer to help, email conference@passivehouse.us with your availability and any special expertise. We could use help with everything from registration desk staffing to videography.

Full schedule — and more announcements on some great presenters — are on the way, stay tuned!

Katrin

 

 

PHNW5 conference: Congratulations on a very impressive event!

The Pacific Northwest Passive House community is the oldest and largest in the country and consequently leads the nation in built, certified projects.  The progress is amazing: When I keynoted the very first PHNW meeting in Olympia, there were about a 100 people, a handful of exhibitors. The number and quantity of presentations and exhibits last week at this year’s even was breathtaking.

PHIUS first brought its CPHC training programs to Portland and Seattle in 2009. Today, of more than 1500 professionals who have taken PHIUS CPHC or Builder training, approximately 300 reside in the Northwest.

Two builders/CPHCs are among those who helped lead the way by building spec projects: Blake Bilyeu’s and his dad’s project in Salem, Ore. (The Rue-Evans House), and  Dan Whitmore’s first passive house project in Seattle. Rob Hawthorne, too, has played a leading role with his Corehaus (which was on the projects tour at the 5th Annual North American Passive House conference, along with Blake’s), Trekhaus and 02Haus. Many, many have joined them. What a success story for the PHNW and the entire PH community!  That’s why I’m giving them a shout out—and I hope my good readers will pass along word of all the good work.

It was gratifying to see that most presented projects at PHNW had been designed, consulted on, built by or rated through PHIUS CPHCs, PHIUS Certified Builders and/or PHIUS+ raters. Nearly all projects put a premium on rigorous third party quality assurance and went with the PHIUS+ Certification program. Thank you for your vote of confidence and continued support of PHIUS. It is much appreciated.

Now, to some conference highlights: Kudos to the Stellar Apartments in Eugene, Ore., the very first PHIUS+ Certified affordable multifamily project! Stellar received PHIUS+ certification in 2013. What a milestone! Congratulations go to Jan Fillinger and Win Swafford as the lead CPHCs/architects on the project and Peter Reppe, also a CPHC, who designed the mechanical system.  University of Oregon Professor Alison Kwok—a former PHIUS board member and a CPHC, and her students pushed the research envelope and presented a detailed study of  measured results of the fully occupied apartments since last September. The developer had decided to build side-by-side examples of the same project: One is built to passive standards, one to Earth Advantage/Energy Star. The student team compared the results of the two test buildings, an excellent comparative study. Stay tuned for final results! I am sure we are going to see a great paper come out of these efforts.

Another highlight: The 19 unit Kiln Apartments in Portland is almost completed and awaiting final PHIUS+ certification. David Posada, who was in the very first CPHC class in Portland, approached me at the 3rdPHNW conference and told me about this multifamily project he wanted to pitch. Thanks to his persistence, it became real. PHIUS stayed involved with David through the PHIUS+ certification process and onsite verification by our PHIUS+ Raters and CPHCs in Portland, Skylar Swinford and Ryan Shanahan.

Skylar and Ryan presented on their quality assurance experience with this project. I was fortunate enough to get a spot on the tour, the only one for which this project is ever going to open its doors for, on Saturday. Truly a pleasure! Thank you, David, for moving this pioneering project forward. I can already see the ripple effect elsewhere in the country. Thank you, Skylar and Ryan, the extremely talented rater team pioneering the onsite verification, and of course also thank you to the architects on this project. It is an exceptionally handsome and exciting building!

The educational content of the conference was on par with the quality of PHIUS annual North American Passive House Conferences: the Northwest was not afraid of the most recent discussions in the field.

PHIUS is proud to note that PHIUS trainers, tech committee and board members Prudence Ferreira, Adam Cohen, Thorsten Chlupp and Chris Benedict presented 4 workshops during the pre-conference program. Prudence covered WUFI dynamic modeling, Chris reviewed multi-family Brooklyn and Manhattan (Chris’s project is also awaiting final PHIUS+ certification and was quality assured through Terry Brennan). Thorsten Chlupp’s presented his invaluable experience from the very cold climate in Alaska. Adam shared his extensive design build experience highlighting the business side of things and commercial projects, also PHIUS+ quality assured.

During the core conference Prudence spoke on the advantages of the WUFI Passive modeling tool. Graham Wright, board member of the PHNW and PHIUS senior scientist, presented on the current standard adaptation status by PHIUS and Building Science Corporation.

Special compliments go to Dan Whitmore, PHIUS certified builder/CPHC trainer and board member of PHNW: He was very much involved in putting together the schedule and presentations. Great work!

Again, it was a pleasure to be there, seeing so many friends and familiar faces. The progress is stunning and will hopefully inspire many all over the United States to follow in your footsteps!

Kat

 

WUFI Passive: One giant leap for passive buildings!

We learned long ago that North America’s climate extremes present critical challenges for passive house designers — the need for cooling and dehumidification are bigger issues here than in Central Europe, for example. That’s why WUFI/ORNL/IBP and WUFI Pro have become essential complementary tools for many CPHCs.

Screenshot of WUFI Passive interface

Well, we have some exciting news–PHIUS has collaborated with the renowned Fraunhofer IBP to create WUFI Passive. This powerful new, commercial-grade, user-friendly software tool combines passive energy modeling with the WUFI’s hygrothermal modeling capabilities.

Fraunhofer brought its considerable software chops and building science experience; PHIUS added years of passive house experience and data gained designing, building, and monitoring passive projects in a wide range of climate zones.

The result is the WUFI Passive–the next generation tool for passive house!

Read more about it here at Fraunhofer IBP.

See WUFI Passive for yourself at the 7th Annual North American Passive House Conference in Denver, September 27-30

And join us in Denver for the WUFI+ coming out party:

  • A full day WUFI Passive Preconference workshop, Thursday, Sept. 27, has been devoted to the new tools. (Requires registration for both morning and afternoon segments.) The sessions will be taught by PHIUS instructors, Florian Antretter (who leads WUFI Passive development for Fraunhofer IBP) and Achilles Karagiosis (of Owens Corning, who is also on the development team).
  • The Main Conference sessions include a Friday segment presented by members of the WUFI Passive development team.
  • PHIUS/PHAUS will be running a demonstration version in the exhibit hall.

There are still slots for attendees and exhibitors, but time’s running out—register now!