Healthy Buildings, Part 1: 9 Principles

An article in ArchDaily details the nine aspects of a building that, according to the Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at Harvard University’s School of Public Health, make that building a healthy place for people to be. The ArchDaily article summarizes a 36-page report called The 9 Foundations Of A Healthy Building. It is not a surprise to PHIUS what the nine items are, or that PHIUS+ certification is the most cost-effective way to get there (more on that later).

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A summary of Harvard’s Nine Foundations of a Healthy Building:

Ventilation — Replace stale indoor air with filtered outdoor air. Test, maintain and monitor equipment regularly.

Air Quality — Eliminate items that offgas, remove legacy pollutants (lead, asbestos, PCBs), limit moisture intrusion. Relative humidity should be kept between 30% and 60% to reduce mold and mildew odors.

Thermal Health — Control humidity and temperature striations. If occupants need control of the thermostat, make that easy. Also, stick to a regular maintenance schedule to make sure equipment is running efficiently.

Moisture — Roofs and walls should not leak, plumbing and HVAC equipment should not condense or leak, and condensation spots (cold spots that become mold spots) should be eliminated or monitored (this is done with continuous insulation, as explained later).

Dust & Pests — Surfaces should be clean, and vacuum filters should be high efficiency because dust is a reservoir for allergens and chemicals. Generally, the focus is on preventing problems (more about solutions below). Airtight construction, described below, also keeps pests out (including bed bugs in apartment buildings, through compartmentalization).

Safety & Security — the items outlined in this section are required by building codes, including fire and carbon monoxide detectors, lighting in stairwells, egress, entry, and parking areas.

Water Quality — beyond a city water supply that meets water quality standards, consider water purifiers and microbial control. Plumbing layouts should be designed to minimize stagnation in pipes.

Noise — beyond outside noise, indoor noise should be controlled. Background noise should be limited to 35db with a maximum reverberation time of 0.7 seconds.

Lighting & Views — Daylighting should be abundant in natural blue light, evening lighting should be devoid of it. Views to the outside and outside-inspired interior themes connect people to nature which can significantly improve recovery from stress and mental fatigue while boosting their cognitive performance.

While nine items is a little more than most people can recall quickly, the point of the Harvard exercise was not to make a snappy list that people could quickly remember but to make a list that accurately reflects healthful buildings. Fortunately for high-performance builders and designers, PHIUS can shorten the list.

Check back later this week to see how the Harvard Healthy Nine translates to the PHIUS Phive!

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