PHIUS+ 2018 Webinar Q&A

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PHIUS Senior Scientist Graham Wright and Certification Manager Lisa White answer questions that were submitted during and after the live PHIUS+ 2018 Webinar on November 8, 2018.

You can view a recording of the webinar at the PHIUS.org site.

*Note: Some questions have been edited for publication

Q: Has PHIUS started to look at overall GWP in the materials used to make these high performance buildings? To save the balance of the climate, reducing our emissions in the next 20 years is critical. Lots of XPS and spray foam make a low energy building but don’t do anything to help our climate goals.

A: The short answer is yes. We do have a GWP impact calculator for insulation. Its use is not required for project certification but we encourage it when we see large areas of XPS or SPF proposed. Our product certification program for construction systems has a requirement for a sustainability or health certification; there are several options recognized.

Q: Can you explain the exuberance concept?

A: We remain enthusiastic about the “tiny heating system” / “tiny heating bill” idea.

Q: Thanks for including Quebec Province! I believe in 2015+, all of North America was calculated according to a blanket value for cleanliness of the grid. Is 2018 adapted to different grids, and how do you deal with Quebec’s very cheap and clean hydroelectricity? Renewables are a tough sell here. Zero government incentives and at 7 cents/kWh, our energy costs would have to more than treble in order to make PV make financial sense.

A: In the standard-setting study itself we used the same factor all the time, but because the buildings were (almost) all electric, it canceled out. The PV generation is multiplied by the same factor as the usage, so source net zero is achieved with the same size PV array as for site net zero.

The philosophy is that CO2 emissions anywhere affect everyone everywhere. We all share one atmosphere, so by a principle of solidarity we should really use the world average source energy factor for electricity. That is, people with clean grids do not get to play “we’ve got ours” and use more energy. Even if your local grid is clean we want to drive additional action such as REC purchases that fund new clean energy projects. In certification we do allow the use of national averages, so we actually just request solidarity at the national level. Canada has a cleaner grid than the US overall, and thus Canadian projects will not have to take as many measures for net source energy reduction. The source energy factor for electricity in Canada is 1.96, whereas it is 2.8 for the US.

The electricity cost does affect some of the space conditioning criteria because higher energy prices justify more conservation measures and thus tighter targets. We calculate this with state-by-state averages, so Quebec projects will have less stringent targets than neighbors in Maine and Vermont.

 

Q: The word “townhouse” usually means a single-family building, but you seem to be using it differently.

A: The individual dwelling units are “single-family, attached”. That is, they share walls but not floor/ceiling. Speaking loosely, the whole row of attached units is the Townhouse, and the study building is 8 or 16 attached units.

Q: Is the mandatory minimum for window upgrades done because it wouldn’t be cost effective otherwise?

A: Yes. Window costs have come down but this still had to be forced in most cases. The starting points were still “in the money” though. There were a few times when the optimizer bought them on its own, but it took a long heating season and high energy price to motivate it. 

 

Q: Is this modeled EUI directly from WUFI Passive in the “Modeled vs. Measured” slide?

A: Yes, the WUFI Passive energy model used for certification.

Q: Do the new non-residential commissioning requirements apply to the common areas of residential buildings or only to all non-residential buildings?

A: TBD. Our current definition (for source energy target purposes) hinges on whether the spaces serve outside clients / customers or just the residents.

 

Q: Are you considering using the last 5 years of climate data vs ASHRAE to deal with global weirdness?

A: No, but we are working on future climate data for 2090 as an informational resource.

 

Q: Any comments on using low-iron glass (easily found in EU / just starting to appear in US)? Does the visible transmittance increase relative to ordinary US glass (which has a green tint to natural light)?

A: Alpen for a while had a low-iron glass option in their certified products, but they discontinued it.

 

Q: Instead of ignoring PV in competing with efficiency measures, why not look at PV with storage for the costs? This may not take care of seasonal differences, but it would take care of daily or weekly changes.

A: We may have have explored it if that was an option in BEopt, but it isn’t yet. Our current thinking is that what batteries do for you depends, in normal operation, on what the time-of-use rate structure looks like, and they are also good for you in outage situations. We are working on a calculation protocol for outages and waiting for utilities or other researchers to converge on time-of-use rate structure(s).

 

Q: Is there an ASHRAE 55 comfort analysis or PMV for PHIUS+?

A: The new window comfort calculator is based on relatively recent research on Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied specifically for draft at the ankle – it doesn’t just hark back to the PMV/PPD that was determined in 1970.

I (Graham) also wrote a paper for the 2016 conference looking at the radiant temperature effect of windows on comfort.

In certification we mostly take the same kind of simple view as in building code, e.g., “thou shalt maintain a dry bulb temperature set point of X and Y”. Sophisticated comfort analyses are more appropriate for workplace and nonresidential cases where clothing and metabolic profiles of occupants can be pinned down (as required by ASHRAE 55), and one might not have to worry so much about frail or sensitive occupants.

 

Comment: Adaptation is why I pursued CPHC in the first place!

Graham Wright: Thanks! Lisa presented on passive survivability at the Boston conference, and we will have more to say about this in the future.

Q: How does the new standard accommodate variable occupancy patterns/equipment usage in non-residential buildings?

A: With respect to the performance targets, as a first step, we will allow two different occupancies to be used to determine the annual demand targets vs. peak loads. Also, we can develop custom criteria for unusual situations (additional fee applies).

With respect to energy modeling protocol, it is already required to enter patterns for occupancy, ventilation and lighting, but this is mostly about getting the annual total energy right for source energy limit purposes.

 

Q: Please define HDD65, IGA, CDD50, TCD, IGCL and DDHR.

A: HDD65 = Heating degree-days, base 65 F;

IGA = Solar Irradiance, global, annual;

CDD50 = Cooling degree-days, base 50 F;

TCD = Temperature, cooling design day;

IGCL = Irradiance, global, cooling load design condition;

DDHR = Dehumidification design humidity ratio.

 

Q: If a project is considering registering under either 2015 or 2018, can we register under 2015 then change to 2018 (as circumstances change) without an additional registration fee?

A: Yes, you can always pursue a newer version of the standard. You are not able to pursue older versions if the contract date is later than the last day to submit under that older standard. In order to register for PHIUS+ 2015, the contract must be submitted before April 1, 2019.

 

Q: Are there updates to WUFI to accommodate the 2018+ standard? And when will it be available?

A: Yes, the next version of WUFI Passive will be released by the end of 2018. We will notify all of PHIUS’ mailing list.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From passive house to passive buildings–what’s new and how manufacturers are stepping it up

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Exciting times indeed for passive building in the United States: Passive design principles that originated here and in Canada are all grown up and making a furious comeback. Policy makers, researchers and scientists, builders and designers are all embracing passive building in their everyday practice.

And as always, the growth is evident here at NESEA’s annual high-performance tour de force: NESEA BE15. A quick recap: Passive Building Place–a concentration of passive building component exhibitors, and the tour of their offerings, is in its fourth consecutive year. For those who remember, we started my first blog on the NESEA trade show focusing on passive house products in 2012. Passive building was still tiny then compared to what it has grown into now.

PHIUS and its membership organization the Passive House Alliance US (PHAUS) – the leading passive building research institute and alliance in the US – is the anchor of Passive Building Place for the fourth straight year.

NESEA never stands still. In its topic selection for conference workshops and presentations it continues to ask the tough questions and pushes the boundaries. I am talking about the passive building standard adaptation work we have been doing on Tuesday in a half day workshop. On Wednesday afternoon as part of the core conference I’ll be presenting about very exciting multifamily developments specifically. The Passive Building Place has become a mainstay and is expanding every year with new manufacturers who have recognized that passive building will be a significant driver for high performing materials and components.

Larger projects like Orenco Orchards in Eugene, Ore.,  by CPHC® Dylan Lamar and GreenHammer are coming on strong–they need more manufacturers to step up to the multifamily and commercial passive building market.

But, as multifamily and commercial projects come on strong, we see hesitation amongst manufacturers regarding new components and material needed for larger building developments. This follows the past trend with single family passive homes: the architects and CPHC®s (Certified Passive House Consultants) have taken on the design of the first larger buildings find themselves ahead of the curve.

While this might sound glamorous to some, in practice it is quite a challenge for the teams. Architects are out to make ambitious reductions in energy and carbon with large buildings, and they need appropriate high performance components. In principle, much of what’s been learned and accomplished in single family applications is transferable. Ideally, however, manufacturers will develop turnkey and warranted solution packages for multifamily and other large buildings. What about superinsulated thermal bridge free airtight curtain wall systems? Is this too much to ask for?

Here’s a good place to start: At last year’s 9th Annual North American Passive House Conference in San Francisco, five leading multifamily passive building teams came together for a presentation.  The one component they all wanted was a fire-rated door, that complies with ADA requirements of a low threshold, is airtight and has exceptional thermal performance comparable to the passive house windows that have taken the BE Passive Building Place by storm over the past few years.

To see what’s cooking this year, we are back for another tour of the trade show with you! I will have the pleasure of guiding a tour on Wednesday, March 4 beginning at 5.30 pm just before the boat tour. We’ll be visiting exhibitors who offer products and components germane to the passive building community. We will stop at selected passive building place exhibitors and Passive House Alliance sponsors inside and outside Passive Building Place. Because there are so many it’s impossible to visit all–instead we’ll focus on innovations and a more in depth conversation of 5-10 minutes discussing the manufacturers’ products.

Also different this year:  We will take the investigative role and instead of highlighting the passive building products we’ve seen in past years, we will challenge vendors with a different question: What are you doing to support larger passive building developments? Are you seeing the effects from it in your practice and what are you doing to respond, to prepare for it? Are there new offerings in the pipeline? What are designers asking for, what is missing?

Our goal is to identify the gap so that we can fill it. We like to inspire manufacturers to take the growth in passive building seriously. Please join us on this tour to hear from manufacturers what they are hearing and to ask the right and tough questions to inspire more high performing systems development for larger U.S. passive buildings.

Twenty-four exhibitors are joining us this year in the Passive Building Place or elsewhere on the floor–they include sponsors of PHAUS, firms with PHIUS certified professionals on staff, firms offering PHIUS verified windows or doors, or that are collaborating with PHIUS/PHAUS otherwise. Those partners are listed here:

475 High Performance Building Supply (Booth # 759)

Auburndale Builders (Booth # 913)

Bright Build Home (Booth # 549)

Conservation Services Group (Booth # 709)

Fraunhofer CSE (Booth # 660)

H Window/Energate (Booth # 642)

Huber Engineered Woods (Booth # 743)

Klearwall Industries LLC (Booth # 862)

Intus Windows (Booth # 624) PHAUS Green Sponsor

Marvin & Integrity Windows (Booth # 939) PHAUS Silver Sponsor

Mitsubishi Electric (Booth # 707) PHAUS Silver Sponsor

New England Homes by Preferred Building Systems (Booth # 919)

Passive House Institute US/Passive House Alliance (Booth # 753)

Pinnacle Windows Solutions (Booth # 763)

PowerWise Systems (Booth # 814)

PROSOCO Inc. (Booth # 949) PHAUS Green Sponsor

Roxul (Booth # 860)

Schock (#636)

SIGA Cover, Inc. (Booth # 620)

Steven Winter Associates (#844)

Stiebel-Eltron Inc. (Booth # 749)

Yestermorrow Design/Build School (Booth # 1036)

Zehnder America, Inc. (Booth # 864) PHAUS Friend Sponsor

Zola Windows (Booth # 755) PHAUS Friend Sponsor

 

We won’t have time to stop at all passive building component vendors, but we urge you to stop check them all out as you find time. Make sure to stop by:

Dryvit (Booth # 430)

Enovative (Booth # 945)

European Architectural Supply (Booth # 727)

Fantech (Booth # 828)

Foard Panel (Booth # 830)

Green Fiber (Booth # 717)

Led Waves (Booth # 628)

Main Green Building Supply (Booth # 622)

Retrotec (Booth # 541)

Sanden International (# 563)

Schock USA (Booth # 636)

Tremco Barrier Solutions (Booth # 719)

Viessmann Manufacturing (Booth # 565)

Yaro DSI (Booth # 638)

Thank you all for participating in this and putting your weight behind this exciting emerging construction market. Again, you are true leaders in this market transformation towards high performance building products that is so needed to achieve zero/positive energy buildings through passive design. Thanks again for joining!

And have a great BE15!

California here we come!

I’m just back from San Francisco where I spent five days to meet with stakeholders and contributors to discuss plans for the conference coming up on September 10-14, 2014.

The talks were amazing and super encouraging! PHIUS+ projects in the Bay Area are exceptional – they all are also zero energy or positive energy buildings highlighting that passive building is the ideal starting point for going zero or positive. This growing trend – passive to positive energy — will be one of the major themes for conference sessions!

Combining passive design in buildings plus renewables is one of the strategies identified by carbon reduction groups to help mitigate and adapt to climate change. The latter because passive buildings are especially resilient in weather extremes and power outages.

San Francisco has long been aiming at carbon zero goals by 2020, looking to identify a clear set of tools on how to practically and cost effectively implement them. That’s why we chose San Francisco for this 9th Annual North American Passive House Conference. We think it can be the catalyst for a tipping point, a special moment in time when the concept is catapulted forward thanks to favorable factors in the Bay Area. With plenty of high quality high-performance projects designed and built by the pioneers in the passive community, we have an excellent opportunity to make the case to make to the city and its residents that passive design is the best path to their goals.

On my trip I have spoken with various stakeholders and thought leaders and have seen nothing but honest excitement about the possibilities of the conferencce. And better yet, if San Francisco get’s it, you know that the rest of the state and then the country will eventually follow, hence it is critical to make this a big success that radiates beyond the borders of California setting a definite sign: we are in the transition toward a new energy economy and buildings, passive and renewables will play an important role in it.

We’re excited that William Rose, a building science pioneer, will deliver our keynote and that Achilles Karagiozis, Director of Building Science for Owens Corning and WUFI developer will speak at the closing plenary. Also: Joe Lstiburek will present a daylong workshop on building science fundamentals during pre-conference sessions.

Of course, success of the conference – as always –will depend on the dedicated members of our community. We’ve collected dozens and dozens of terrific presentation proposals (and we’re a week or two behind in our review, please accept our apologies; we’ll be in touch soon), and the content of our breakouts will be terrific, as always. We also have a great range of pre-conference sessions (which als earn CPHC CEUs), including a daylong session with five CPHCs who are leading the way in multifamily builldings. Visit the conference website often for updates.

And if you’re available to volunteer to help, email conference@passivehouse.us with your availability and any special expertise. We could use help with everything from registration desk staffing to videography.

Full schedule — and more announcements on some great presenters — are on the way, stay tuned!

Katrin