PhiusCon Pre-Conference: Building Science Rocks in Tarrytown!

There will be something for everyone at PhiusCon 2021 Pre-Conference, a great way to warm up for the PhiusCon Core Conference–all in Tarrytown, New York.

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Prudence Ferreira

Pre-conference starts on Tuesday, Oct. 12, with a trio of diverse sessions. One of our most highly anticipated sessions is “Phius Critical Path for Large-Scale Buildings” presented by BR+A Consulting Engineers Senior Associate and Phius Board Member Prudence Ferreira. With more than a decade of passive house experience to work from, Ferreira will share her approach and tools for approaching the more complex, large-scale Phius projects.

She has outlined the following learning objectives for the workshop:

  1. Define Phius critical path items and process
  2. Explore strategies and tools for managing complexity
  3. Examine energy modeling approaches for large-scale projects
  4. Analyze Phius protocols unique to large-scale projects
John Loercher

John Loercher

Running concurrently is “WUFI Passive for Beginners” featuring Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Building Science Program Director and Phius Certification Staff Member John Loercher. This session is meant both for those learning the WUFI Passive modeling tool for the first time as well as those who were exposed to it during CPHC® training, but have yet to use it on a project.

Katrin Klingenberg

Katrin Klingenberg

For those looking for a broader, more introductory workshop, there is “Passive Building 101” presented by Phius Co-Founder and Executive Director Katrin Klingenberg. This session offers a high-level overview of passive building, covering topics such as: passive house history, rationale for passive building standards, five core principles of passive building, certification processes, benefits of certification, and more!

Things won’t slow down on Oct. 13, as the sessions listed below make for a full day of passive building education and discussion.

  • Prescription for Better Buildings: Phius 2021 Prescriptive
  • Climate and Social Equity Workshop
  • Developer’s Multifamily Buildings of Excellence Case Studies
  • What’s My Size: Using the Newly Revised Manuals for VCHP Sizing

The “Climate and Social Equity Workshop” is free to attend, but registration is requested. It will be hosted by Clean Energy Works Managing Director Tamara Jones, HLW International Designer Satpal Kaur and Topsight Advisors LLC Principal Bomee Jung. The workshop will ask attendees to think critically about the topic of climate justice, which is the principle that actions to mitigate or adapt to climate change should equitably distribute their benefits, redress existing inequities, and dismantle institutional racism.

Mitsubishi Electric Trane US Sr. Product Manager Kimberly Llewellyn’s “What’s My Size: Using the Newly Revised Manuals for VCHP Sizing” workshop promises to be another highlight of the second day of Pre-Conference. She is one of the top mechanical systems experts in the country, and her presentation will focus on the management of humidity loads in high-performance buildings. Questions answered during the session are to include: When is an ERV enough to maintain acceptable interior conditions? What is the interplay of efficiency metrics for dehumidifiers vs heat pumps and where do rating metrics need to go in order to support development of HVAC equipment that can operate optimally in low SHF conditions?

We also don’t want you to forget about the New York City Passive Projects Tour, which is slated for Oct. 12 as well. Attendees will explore some of the largest, most innovative projects in the country. 

If you can’t get enough of Phius and passive house, you belong at PhiusCon 2021 Pre-Conference. Pre-Conference and Tour tickets are sold separately, so be sure to buy yours today!

 

Green/Blue Roofing System Question Answered

 

GWPhius Senior Scientist Graham Wright weighs in on an interesting proposal for a green/blue roofing system and its feasibility for use on a Phius project.

The Question: “…The design team is considering a Green/Blue roofing system. Some of these systems / designs show rainwater being stored underneath the continuous insulation on the roof. We wanted to run these design concepts by you to understand what questions we should be asking and what information we should be gathering in order to model this, whether you have encountered this and have thoughts on how to model / approach this, and/or whether we should steer away from any of these designs altogether.”

The Answer: As far as I can tell, Green roofs and high insulation are not compatible, or, this is a research area.

The concept shown has only a thin layer of insulation. The Opti-Green system in the WUFI database is about R-3 overall. This research paper from 2012 looked at an R-22 roof.  

Green-Blue Roof Graphic

So, first thought: you probably could not do a large area of this and hope to meet the energy targets. It might be OK to experiment with it in a small area. They should ask if what is being proposed has any track record. Has this ever actually been built before in this climate?

Second thought: There is also clearly a tradeoff with the insulation positioned where it is. On the one hand, placing it above the water helps keep the water from freezing. On the other hand, how does the water get up through the insulation to the plants? If there are perforations, then the “fastener correction” calc should be done to derate the insulation. This becomes more troublesome the thicker the insulation is. Also, water flowing and draining away beneath the insulation will defeat its winter performance. This will happen whenever it rains enough during the heating season, and there should be another derating for that.  

Third thought: I think the idea of these is there is an evaporative cooling benefit in the summer. So it might make sense for a cooling-dominated building in the right kind of climate — e.g. one with warm summers but not too dry summers — so you get free rain water and don’t have to pump water up for irrigation. In terms of both energy savings and heat island mitigation, I think a foam-insulated and cool-membrane roof would compete very well with this concept and would be a lot lighter. If they are thinking of doing a whole roof this way, I would suggest doing a comparison to such a baseline case on both cost and simulated performance by WUFI Pro.

 

The article about green roof modeling mentioned in the WUFI help is here

Energy and Buildings

Volume 145, 15 June 2017, Pages 79-91

Energy and Buildings

A hygrothermal green roof model to simulate moisture and energy performance of building components

D.Zirkelbach S.-R.Mehra K.-P.Sedlbauer H.-M.Künzel  B.Stöckla

PHIUS+ 2021 Source Energy Factor for Grid Electricity

PHIUS+ 2021 will include a change to the source energy calculation for grid electricity to more accurately reflect future grid conditions and better weigh the impact of electricity versus natural gas use on site.

In past versions of PHIUS+, the source energy factor for grid electricity was defined by the Energy Star Portfolio Manager and was determined based on past generation and consumption data from the EIA. The calculation methodology accounts for the total primary fuel needed to deliver heat and electricity to the site, including conversion losses at the plant as well as transmission and distribution losses incurred to deliver electricity to the building. Under PHIUS+ 2018, the source energy factor for grid electricity for the U.S. was 2.80, which was an average of the EIA reported data from 2012-2016.

With the release of  PHIUS+ 2021 the calculated factor for the United States grid electricity is 1.73 which reflects a 2050 outlook. 

Figure 1: U.S. power sector evolution over time for the NREL Mid-case scenario

Figure 1: U.S. power sector evolution over time for the NREL Mid-case scenario

Calculating a future source energy factor for the United States electric grid electricity required the combination of three data sets: 

(1) The projected future electricity generation mix, which was taken from NREL’s Mid-Case Scenario for 2050.

(2) Fuel conversion energy factors per generation type from the EIA.

(3) Total system losses from transmission, distribution and storage, taken from eGRID2018 and NREL’s future grid mix scenario.

A detailed description of the calculation methodology and corresponding data sources can be found in the PHIUS Tech Corner article. Read the full article here.

 

EPA Indoor airPLUS and Radon Resistant Construction

0Today’s guest blogger is Tony Lisanti, PHIUS+ QA/QC manager. 

One of the prerequisite programs required for PHIUS+ Certification is the EPA’s Indoor airPLUS Program.  Born out of a need to minimize indoor air pollutants, the EPA dove-tailed this program with the ENERGY STAR Labeled Homes Program, which is also a prerequisite for the home or dwelling unit to earn both Indoor airPLUS and PHIUS+.  This serves to ensure that the dwelling unit is relatively tight, insulation is properly installed, the HVAC systems are properly sized, and bulk moisture throughout the building assembly is properly controlled.

Indoor airPLUS then takes indoor air quality to the next level. Integrating the Construction Specifications and Checklist requirements into the design, homes/dwelling units can then be verified to ensure greater precautions are taken for moisture control and dehumidification, air intakes are protected from birds and rodents, HVAC systems are kept clean, better filter media is used, and potential sources of moisture and contaminants are vented to the outdoors. Additionally, HVAC systems and ducts are prohibited in garages, pollutants from combustion equipment are minimized, and low VOC products are used.

One of the unique and important aspects of Indoor airPLUS is the requirement for radon-resistant construction measures in EPA Radon Zone 1. If you are not familiar with the Radon Zone map, it can be found here:  https://www.epa.gov/radon/epa-map-radon-zones.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can cause lung cancer. In fact, the EPA estimates that 21,000 deaths each year in the U.S. are attributable to radon exposure. The EPA has very good resources to read up on the health risks of radon. Their site can be found here: https://www.epa.gov/radon/health-risk-radon#head.

So why should PHIUS stakeholders be concerned with this? As mentioned above, PHIUS relies heavily on prerequisite programs such as ENERGY STAR and Indoor airPLUS. Since the airtightness standards for PHIUS Certified projects are up to 10 times more stringent than a typical code-built home, dilution of the indoor air cannot occur as readily. PHIUS ventilation requirements go well beyond those of systems found in typical Code built or even Energy Star Labeled homes. Good ventilation design, whether for code or for PHIUS starts with source control, i.e. minimizing the source of contaminants along with proper ventilation.

An example of a passive radon system.

An example of a passive radon system.

In high risk areas such as Radon Zone 1, EPA Indoor airPLUS requires installation of a passive radon system, at minimum. EPA also recommends utilizing active radon systems to further reduce radon concentrations in the home, although this is not yet an Indoor airPLUS requirement. The most modern radon standards are developed through an ANSI-accredited consensus process by the AARST Consortium (American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists). EPA recommends following the ANSI/AARST CCAH Standard for 1-2 family dwellings and townhouses (max. total foundation area of 2500 sq. ft.) or the ANSI/AARST CC-1000 Standard for larger foundations, which often apply in multifamily buildings. However, the key components of a passive radon system for the purposes of Indoor airPLUS verification are succinctly outlined in Item 2.1 of their Construction Specifications.

ANSI/AARST will soon publish updated standards to provide guidance for the design and installation of two radon system options in new low-rise residential buildings. These systems, passive and powered, are designed to reduce elevated indoor radon levels by inducing a negative pressure in the soil below the building. The practice provides design and installation methods through soil depressurization systems that can be installed in in any geographic area.

Each of the two options consists of soil gas collection and a pipe distribution system to exhaust these gases. The first standard is for the design of passive radon reduction systems, sometimes referred to as a “radon rough-in” (ANSI/AARST RRNC). The second newly updated standard (anticipated in early 2020) includes details for a fan-powered radon reduction system, as well as radon testing (ANSI/AARST CCAH). Passive systems can result in reduced radon levels of up to 50%. These standards suggest that when radon test results for a building with a passive system are not acceptable, the system be converted to fan-powered operation. Typically, the action level is 4 pCi/L (Picocuries per liter). If the tested radon level exceeds 4pCI/L, then a fan is added to further depressurize the soil and positively vent the gas to the outside.

Recently, the EPA Indoor airPLUS team sent out this Technical Bulletin. The Technical Bulletin provides simple guidance on the installation of passive and active radon systems. Please pay particular attention to the drawings in the Bulletin, and note that the active system depicted has the fan located in a vented attic. This is outside the pressure/thermal boundary of the home. This has special significance with homes/buildings constructed to PHIUS Standards, because often, the attic space is WITHIN the pressure/thermal boundary of the home. Therefore, the fan cannot be located in the attic and must be outside the pressure/thermal boundary. The reason for this is, should there be a failure on the discharge or pressurized side of the fan, the building can actually be filled with radon gas.

Some other precautions that include a tight seal at the slab and vapor barrier to the vertical riser. Additionally, ensuring the riser is clearly labeled as “RADON” to minimize the chance that a plumbing waste line will be accidentally connected to it in the future is also important.

Tony Lisanti CEM, CPHC
PHIUS+ QA/QC Manager

With thanks to Nicholas Hurst from the EPA Indoor airPLUS Team

WUFI® Passive V.3.2.0.1 validation using ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140-2017

Good news: PHIUS has completed modeling to validate WUFI Passive according to ASHRAE 140. Read the full report here

ASHRAE 140 is a comprehensive Standard Method of Test (SMOT) for the evaluation of building energy analysis computer programs. The ASHRAE 140 report provides the information accrediting agencies or jurisdictions need for validation or acceptance of WUFI ® Passive for code and policy purposes. In short, the standard describes test buildings (cases) in significant detail in order to model the building and compare results versus other software. It contains a comprehensive description of test procedures, as well as predictions generated by WUFI Passive software evaluated against predictive benchmarks.

The table below provides a description of the test cases used for ASHRAE 140 Validation. 

Table 1

Annual Heating and Annual Cooling Load results were reported for most cases, except for L302-L324A which only analyzed heating. WUFI Passive results fell well into the suggested acceptance ranges in all test cases when following Class II Procedures of ASHRAE Standard 140.  Most results fell toward the center of the confidence range as shown in the graphs below.
AHL Results

ACL Results

Authors: Lisa White, Jasmine Garland