PhiusCon Pre-Conference: Building Science Rocks in Tarrytown!

There will be something for everyone at PhiusCon 2021 Pre-Conference, a great way to warm up for the PhiusCon Core Conference–all in Tarrytown, New York.

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Prudence Ferreira

Pre-conference starts on Tuesday, Oct. 12, with a trio of diverse sessions. One of our most highly anticipated sessions is “Phius Critical Path for Large-Scale Buildings” presented by BR+A Consulting Engineers Senior Associate and Phius Board Member Prudence Ferreira. With more than a decade of passive house experience to work from, Ferreira will share her approach and tools for approaching the more complex, large-scale Phius projects.

She has outlined the following learning objectives for the workshop:

  1. Define Phius critical path items and process
  2. Explore strategies and tools for managing complexity
  3. Examine energy modeling approaches for large-scale projects
  4. Analyze Phius protocols unique to large-scale projects
John Loercher

John Loercher

Running concurrently is “WUFI Passive for Beginners” featuring Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Building Science Program Director and Phius Certification Staff Member John Loercher. This session is meant both for those learning the WUFI Passive modeling tool for the first time as well as those who were exposed to it during CPHC® training, but have yet to use it on a project.

Katrin Klingenberg

Katrin Klingenberg

For those looking for a broader, more introductory workshop, there is “Passive Building 101” presented by Phius Co-Founder and Executive Director Katrin Klingenberg. This session offers a high-level overview of passive building, covering topics such as: passive house history, rationale for passive building standards, five core principles of passive building, certification processes, benefits of certification, and more!

Things won’t slow down on Oct. 13, as the sessions listed below make for a full day of passive building education and discussion.

  • Prescription for Better Buildings: Phius 2021 Prescriptive
  • Climate and Social Equity Workshop
  • Developer’s Multifamily Buildings of Excellence Case Studies
  • What’s My Size: Using the Newly Revised Manuals for VCHP Sizing

The “Climate and Social Equity Workshop” is free to attend, but registration is requested. It will be hosted by Clean Energy Works Managing Director Tamara Jones, HLW International Designer Satpal Kaur and Topsight Advisors LLC Principal Bomee Jung. The workshop will ask attendees to think critically about the topic of climate justice, which is the principle that actions to mitigate or adapt to climate change should equitably distribute their benefits, redress existing inequities, and dismantle institutional racism.

Mitsubishi Electric Trane US Sr. Product Manager Kimberly Llewellyn’s “What’s My Size: Using the Newly Revised Manuals for VCHP Sizing” workshop promises to be another highlight of the second day of Pre-Conference. She is one of the top mechanical systems experts in the country, and her presentation will focus on the management of humidity loads in high-performance buildings. Questions answered during the session are to include: When is an ERV enough to maintain acceptable interior conditions? What is the interplay of efficiency metrics for dehumidifiers vs heat pumps and where do rating metrics need to go in order to support development of HVAC equipment that can operate optimally in low SHF conditions?

We also don’t want you to forget about the New York City Passive Projects Tour, which is slated for Oct. 12 as well. Attendees will explore some of the largest, most innovative projects in the country. 

If you can’t get enough of Phius and passive house, you belong at PhiusCon 2021 Pre-Conference. Pre-Conference and Tour tickets are sold separately, so be sure to buy yours today!

 

Building a ZERO Carbon Future, Together!

Katrin HeadshotPhius Co-Founder and Executive Director Katrin Klingenberg wrote this week’s blog post in advance of her “Zero Energy and the Future of Phius” webinar on Sept. 14. It covers a variety of topics related to Phius’ work and the expanded vision of the organization.

“The west is on fire, and the east is drowning.”

Those attention-grabbing words were the first thing I heard when I turned on my TV the other day.

“The levees held, but the power grid folded”

That was a headline from the day after hurricane Ida swept across Louisiana. Most of the state was left without power; temperatures in the aftermath were predicted to rise into the 100s, all after a ton of rain and flooding. The combination of high temperatures and humidity is life-threatening — on top of all the other hardships brought on by the storm.

And then there was the Texas winter with the grid folding and people and pipes freezing in homes…

The urgency is clear. At our most recent Phius board retreat there was consensus: we are in dire straits climate-wise — it is now or never.

Since its inception, Phius’ vision has had a North Star: to create a carbon-neutral, healthy, safe, and just future for everyone by mitigating the climate crisis. And our mission is to do just that by making passive house and building standards mainstream.

The vision was extended to using passive house and building principles as the basis for all zero-energy and carbon designs. We added the Phius Source Zero certification program in 2012. Net zero is a good first step, but we need to revise the framework. In practice, net zero isn’t enough. 

The conclusion we at Phius have reached — following the thought leadership of our Senior Scientist Graham Wright — is that we need to aim to reach absolute zero in short order to avert the ultimate climate crisis. And that is absolute zero as per the original definition of zero – the absence of a measurable quantity.

A New Brand

We are upping our game on multiple levels in order to emphasize our renewed commitment to solving the ZERO-carbon puzzle for buildings. 

New Brand Same Phius GraphicWe started by reimagining the Phius brand. We are updating its look and making products and messages more relatable without sacrificing what we are known for: scientific rigor, precision, quality assurance, proven guidance, and performance. We are also unifying and expanding our suite of certifications for buildings, products and professionals. We are upping the ante on benefits to our professional members under the Phius Alliance leadership and yes, we are creating exceptionally cool swag to encourage everyone to join our tribe and make it our lifestyle together! Together, our community is creating momentum in the market — and having fun with it!

We also re-organized ourselves internally in more efficient ways over the last year, invested in a new website and a CRM, architecture. And we doubled our staff — to aim for greater, faster and increasingly exponential impact and service for our stakeholders. 

In addition, we are making dedicated efforts to reach out to communities beyond the building industry, to explain why what we do matters to everyone. Renters and owners all have a stake in what we do, and we are all one or the other. We want to give everyone an opportunity to get involved. It is up to all of us now! Join us!

Expanded Vision

Over the last decade, Phius has become the global leader in defining cost-effective and climate-optimized, passive house and building standards. Phius certified projects are now coming in at little or no cost premium compared to conventional buildings. Phius also leads in professional training, certification, and workforce development. We also provide an element critical to mainstream adoption: Quality assurance and risk management.

The building sector accounts for 40 percent of carbon emissions, and is key to achieving emissions reduction goals. Passive house and building principles have been, and will continue to be, CORE to our efforts. In that spirit, the formerly known PHIUS+ building certifications have been renamed and expanded. 

PHIUS+ will now be referred to as Phius CORE (before renewables) and PHIUS+ Source Zero will now be Phius ZERO (based on CORE), and will extend to netting out emissions on an annual basis. New passive house and building retrofit certifications are in the offing as well. Phius CORE REVIVE and Phius ZERO REVIVE, as well as a new commercial building certification called Phius CORE COMM and Phius ZERO COMM will be introduced in 2022. 

Phius certifications have grown exponentially around the continent in recent years. Policy progress nationwide has been impressive to say the least. We are in Tarrytown, New York, for PhiusCon 2021 (formerly North American Passive House Conference) to celebrate the leadership of New York State/NYSERDA in formulating an aggressive climate action plan — a process which Phius helped inform. Other states, such as Massachusetts, have modeled their plans after New York’s. Phius’ pre- and fully certified unit count in Massachusetts over the last few years alone is impressive.

Phius Housing Units (In Process or Complete)

 

The Phius Alliance has expanded nationally, and the global network continues to grow. Phius projects have now been completed or are under way in many countries with varying climate zones. The Phius professional training has been translated into Japanese and has been taught this year successfully in Japan by Phius partner PHIJP.

The last decade was focused on figuring out the building part of the decarbonization equation (mission accomplished — solving for climate, cost, comfort). Now it’s time to expand beyond the building itself. We see Phius buildings as valuable capacitors of the new, renewable grid. They are low-load buildings that have the ability to load-shift and shed, which is immensely beneficial to the optimization of the overall grid design and resilience. 

Phius has begun to assess and measure the benefits of low-load buildings for the overall grid design, including micro and nano grid models. We call this initiative Phius GEB (Phius Grid-interactive Efficient Buildings) led by our Associate Director Lisa White. A pilot for a microgrid Phius community certification is underway. Buildings plug into the grid, and new opportunities for synergies and resilience arise. Design for the best result does not stop at the building envelope or lot line. 

Our new teal-colored logo symbolizes this expanded vision. It is a closed loop symbolizing whole systems design on all levels, aiming at harvesting adjacent system synergies: “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” The color teal represents clarity of thought, rejuvenation, open communication and integrity. 

Same Phius

While Phius will be steadily expanding its zero-carbon framework beyond its hallmark passive house and building standards, we will maintain our core competencies of aiding in design, building, policy writing and quality assurance. We are working to solidify and upgrade our foundational programs. Certification staff has doubled and processes are being refined. We are working on getting even better at what we already do well!

The Phius focus has evolved to the broader task of decarbonization. We’ll do so with the same scientific rigor and attention to detail as before. Our goal is the next level of systems optimization so we as a society can make real-time ZERO carbon (not just net) a reality soon!

We hope you’ll join us and continue to trust us to pave the way for the future of decarbonization strategies. There is still lots to do, so let’s get to it!

PhiusCon 2021: Emissions Down, Scale Up — Together!

For four days in October, the center of the passive building world will be Tarrytown, New York.

That is to say that if there’s something important going on in the passive building world, we probably have an expert booked to discuss it at PhiusCon 2021. This year’s conference will be tucked away at the scenic Sleepy Hollow Hotel Convention Center in the beautiful Hudson Valley. It will have a distinct New York accent as we have partnered with New York State Energy Research and Development (NYSERDA) for the event.

The locale for PhiusCon 2021 is no accident. Thanks in large part to years of tireless effort by Phius and NYSERDA, New York has become the country’s unquestioned leader in climate action policy.

425 Grand Concourse 1New York State and NYSERDA have embraced passive building like nowhere else, and we are thrilled they have invited us to New York State where we can properly feature the progress that has been made in New York to our national and international audience at PhiusCon. As New York City’s gateway to the rest of the state, Tarrytown is the perfect location for PhiusCon 2021, allowing us to show off passive projects in the city and throughout the great state of New York.

Pre-Conference workshops will be running Oct. 12-13, during which attendees can immerse themselves in subjects ranging from multifamily for developers to climate and social equity and WUFI Passive.

The core conference is set for Oct. 14-15 and is to feature sessions covering the following topics and much more:

  • States’ and cities’ climate action and zero energy code progress
  • Innovation in finance and technology
  • Optimized methods to bring down cost for design, construction and manufacturing
  • Zero energy building + renewable energy grid solutions such as microgrids, energy storage, virtual power plants
  • Successful passive retrofit solutions including manufactured component approaches such as panel systems
  • International climate-specific passive projects
  • QA/QC professional experiences in multiple building typologies

The list of speakers for PhiusCon 2021 is as distinguished and diverse as we have ever had, as building science professionals from around the globe are slated to give presentations. Keynote speakers are to include: POAH Vice President for Design and Building Performance Julie Klump, Energy Circle Founder and CEO Peter Troast, and Building Science Corporation Founding Principal Dr. Joseph Lstiburek.

This is the first year in the conference’s history that there are two different passive project tours scheduled. There is a New York City tour scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 12, which will showcase some of the largest multifamily passive projects in the country. And the Hudson Valley tour on Saturday, Oct. 16, will include a variety of creatively designed single-family homes in the area.

The winners of our 2021 Passive Projects Design Competition will also be announced as part of the PhiusCon festivities. Winning and honorable mention awards for the competition will be given in five categories:

  • Single-Family
  • Multi-Family
  • Affordable
  • Commercial/Institutional
  • Source Zero

Entries are being accepted until Oct. 1. For more information on the design competition, visit the PhiusCon website.

 

COVID Protocols

The safety of all PhiusCon 2021 attendees is at the top of our minds as the state of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States continues to evolve.

We hope to alleviate any concerns held by prospective attendees by laying out the COVID-19 protocols that will be in place for PhiusCon

  • CDC recommendations related to masking will be followed and enforced
  • All State and local mandates related to COVID-19 will be adhered to
  • N95 masks and hand sanitizer will be made available to attendees
  • If you feel sick, do not attend the conference
  • Presenters will be distanced from attendees and masked during presentations

As of the time of this newsletter, there are no COVID-19 capacity restrictions in place at the Sleepy Hollow Hotel Convention Center where the conference is being held. For those who choose not to attend in person, there are virtual tickets on sale, which provide access to a live stream of select presentations. There is no plan to convert PhiusCon to a fully virtual event.
If you have any more questions or concerns related to the COVID-19 protocols at PhiusCon 2021, please email conference@phius.org.

PHIUS Mechanical Summit – Why?

mech summit sig_v1

About a year ago I met with Gabriela Martin for coffee (outdoors, socially distanced and masked up). Gabriela is the Zero-Energy program mastermind and manager at the Illinois Clean Energy Communities Foundation. Several school buildings used PHIUS standards to meet the ICECF zero-energy goal. The projects that receive ICECF funding only receive the full grant when the project actually meets the zero-energy goal, which requires detailed monitoring of actual performance. Gabriela tells me about her findings, sighs… says the envelope is next to perfect, doing its job but the systems…a whole other story. Almost all the awarded buildings have missed the target so far. The culprit: the performance of the mechanical systems.

Mechanical…what do we mean by that and why does this topic warrant an entire summit in and of itself? I think of mechanical as encompassing balanced ventilation, space conditioning, hot water and electrical…in short all active systems and their components needed in a building. In terms of achieving, mechanical systems are the weakest link.

This is due for two main reasons.

1. Claimed systems efficiencies often are optimistic.
2. Installation is often wanting, including distribution, significantly reducing whole systems efficiencies.

Neither of these are necessarily anybody’s fault. But it points out that existing mechanical systems design for inefficient buildings: Designers and installers over-compensate for inaccuracies and potentially bad installs by designing and installing oversized systems allowing for redundancy.

Belts and suspenders.

Passive building requirements are different. The tolerances for inaccurate assumptions are much smaller. Passive buildings fundamentally act differently and need differently calibrated components to account for comfort.

In absence of systems and equipment designed for low-load buildings, most design teams are left to improvise. They assemble components that might not typically be used in conjunction in conventional construction…they have to make do with what they can find on the market, improvising solutions that are not ideal for passive buildings.

We need and deserve better!

• We practioners need to keep pushing to build the market to help manufacturers justify new products that meet our needs. We need to be clear about what we need.

• We need manufacturers to hear us, to offer help creating solutions from existing products, and to eventually respond with new products for low-load buildings.

We want the PHIUS Mechanical Summit to accelerate our efforts; to advance the conversation between the designers, manufacturers and installers.

Policy makers are taking notice, and that’s great. But to fulfill the net Zero promise, it is clear, we need the larger HVAC and other manufacturers to enter the scene, and in short order!

Passive building, low load systems design can be the economic key to mainstreaming zero energy buidlings. Its mechanical systems can be minimized and designed in an integrated way, offering “plug-and-play,” it would yield a significant reduction in terms of first cost, operational cost and maintenance. This could dramatically change the economic feasibility of zero energy buildings and facilitate it going mainstream.

During the first CPHC classes in 2008, I used to describe how we conventionally build our houses. We build the same envelope in all climates (usually with scant attention to insulation and air sealing), and then we put a giant furnace into it to keep us comfortable. The size of that furnace is variable, depending on the climate, it comes in big or huge. Energy was not a prime concern.

In a passive building we turn that idea on its head. What if we made the shell of a building do most of the work instead of the furnace? We’d make its shell match the climate when insulating it and air-seal it. We then make sure it is right-sized so that the small “micro-load” system has no trouble keeping the space comfortable no matter where we build. The micro-load system of a predetermined size would also assure that we meet our carbon reduction goals and reduce our carbon footprint. It would act like cruise control to stay under the emissions speed limit.

What if the envelope is designed to do the heavy lifting, to fit the micro-load system instead of the other way around? That was the initial ground-breaking idea brought forward by the passive house pioneers in the 1970s in response to the oil embargo in an effort to reduce total energy consumption by about 70%, reducing the micro-load mechanicals to only about 15% capacity of a regular system! This idea is a BIG DEAL! 85% in reduction of systems size!

We on the building and design side have been hampered by the lack of low load systems on the market specifically designed for the changed dynamics in low load buildings. Mechanical engineers often are unfamiliar with passive building design. Manufacturers have not yet responded to the emerging passive building market’s unique demands—to now, the market wasn’t there. But that is changing.

Growth has been driven by creative design teams that often make do with components designed for conventional buildings. But in terms of maintenance and scaling, the status quo won’t do.

We need solutions that account for balanced ventilation, loads, load relationships and distribution requirements in passive buildings. Such packaged solutions are emerging, driven by small companies, that can make progress only very slowly but it is a positive sign. What about joint ventures?

That’s the kind of question we’d like to address at the summit, in addition to sharing lessons learned about how existing equipment has been used to solve the passive mechanical puzzle.

We’ve come a long, long way since I built my own passive home back in 2003. But to get where we want to go: mainstream passive building to achieve Zero, we need to tackle the mechanical issue.

Let’s do it like we always have, together.

Please join us during Earth Week for the PHIUS Mechanical Summit.

Each day of the Summit will cover one of four main topics in an effort to bring further awareness to what components and practices can help create a solid mechanical system across different climates:

Day 1, 4/19: Design Principles / Best Practices
Day 2, 4/20: Gap Solutions / Tools
Day 3, 4/21: Products / Systems Designs
Day 4, 4/22: Earth day: Zero Energy and Carbon / Electrification

PHIUS will offer both pre-recorded, on-demand content and a live panel Q&A discussion for each day of the Summit. The experts featured in both mediums will cover a large segment of passive building practice areas. Attendees will hear from those involved in product development, systems design, energy modeling, HVAC installation, and quality assurance.

See you there!

Kat

A Climate Action Turning Point!

That's friend of PHIUS and visionary NYC architect Chris Benedict (l) with Katrin Klingenberg.

That’s friend of PHIUS and visionary NYC architect Chris Benedict (l) with Katrin Klingenberg.

On October 29th I was fortunate to attend the NYSERDA low carbon and zero energy Buildings of Excellence Awards at the Building Energy Exchange in New York City. What a terrific time for projects that are about to and that have employed PHIUS+ passive building standards as baseline to get to zero energy ready! I counted at least 10 PHIUS+ project teams in NYSERDA’s three categories, Early Design Stage, Substantial Completion and Completed, that were awarded up to 1 million dollars for their projects!The awards were announced on the 7th anniversary of super storm Sandy, not a coincidence, as a reminder for urgent climate action. Seven years later, NYC is leading by action and is putting itself firmly on the path of global leadership in building energy and resilience. Thank you to an amazingly dedicated NYSERDA team for making this happen!

The week before the event, I keynoted the Boston Passive House Massachusetts Symposium to talk about the evolution of the PHIUS+ certification suite for passive buildings, and why they provide such great value on the path to ZERO. Here as well, political action was taken to combat climate change: MassSave staff announced significant incentives for low carbon and zero energy buildings and significant additional incentives if project teams go for passive building certification for their hi-rise residential projects. Certification requests from Mass have increased manifold as a result. Massachusetts in not far behind NY State in political will, turns out.

And just a few weeks before the Boston event, it was gratifying to find that at the Getting to Zero Forum in Oakland, California, passive building was simply understood as the logical starting point on the path to ZERO, no questions asked. During one of the plenaries the ASHRAE speaker proudly introduced the new ASHRAE standards committee: 227p Passive Building Design Standard. That was great news and evidence that ASHRAE is moving on the topic.

During the lunch plenary on day one the National Renewable Energy Laboratory featured PHIUS board member Mary Rogero’s students presenting their Solar Decathlon winning PHIUS+ Source Zero energy school design. For the closing plenary, California’s Commissioner Andrew McAllister presented on his recently completed and only recently occupied zero energy passive house in Berkeley and the benefit of energy independence. He had electricity while PG&E had shut off power supply to prevent fires, a consequence of climate change, to most of Berkeley including the entire Berkeley Campus. He was followed by Greg Hale, from NYSERDA, who spoke about applying the Energiesprong passive plus zero energy retrofit approach that he is spearheading in NYS and other zero carbon measures taken by the city.

And while most of the building action seems to be happening on the East Coast, quietly behind the scenes advocates have been working hard to get passive building into codes all over the country. When PHIUS was first established our lofty mission was to make passive building code by 2020. As ambitious a goal that was then in 2007, we have made significant progress toward it, and have paved the path for national success. NY State has included passive building as an alternative compliance path into the next stretch code and Washington State is on a similar path. Massachusetts has included an alternative compliance path for passive buildings and verification tools (no double modeling required) and Washington, D.C. also has included an alternate compliance path for passive buildings in their about to be launched ZERO Energy Code.

Most significant of all those developments is the establishment of the ASHRAE 227p standards committee. If successful they’ll created a passive building design standard that takes the best pathways from all existing programs and develop an even better, easily adopted design standard globally. That committee has now started its so very important work. The ball is rolling! Stay tuned for more!

Exciting times, indeed!