Strengthening the Core

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With PHIUS+2018 we took a clear step forward in our commitment to being on the frontline of promoting sustainable energy use in buildings and reducing carbon emissions.

But passive building stakeholders have raised some valid concerns about PHIUS+ 2018 that deserve to be addressed.

The most important concern expressed is that PHIUS+ 2018 appears to move away from the core principle of passive building—that being conservation first and foremost. Rest assured: that principle remains at the core of PHIUS+ 2018. As with PHIUS+ 2015, the foundation of PHIUS+ 2018 is cost-optimized on-site conservation. That core principle is baked into the PHIUS+ 2018 standard, WUFI Passive and heating/cooling energy targets.

Cover image of Certification Guidebook and link to download PDF.

Click to review the update in Section 3.3 of the Certification Guidebook

PHIUS+ 2018 goes further by requiring steps toward net zero source energy, with a mind to carbon reduction. What’s new is that project teams now can also choose offsite renewable energy sources to meet the source energy target.

Despite that change, the core conservation principle never went away—conservation targets on heating and cooling energy still must be achieved using passive measures under PHIUS+ 2018 first.

Some of you have also raised concerns about situations where it’s difficult to go beyond on-site conservation. In particular, high unit density can be problematic. For these circumstances, PHIUS is adding the PHIUS+ Core certification path. Project teams can achieve PHIUS+ Core certification with strictly on-site measures. See Section 3.3 of the updated Guidebook for details.

And, we welcome your input—use the form below to comment.

Regards,

Katrin Klingenberg, PHIUS Executive Director

What’s new in WUFI Passive 3.2

Lisa White

Lisa White

By Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

The PHIUS Certification Staff and PHIUS Technical Committee have been hard at work collaborating with the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics (IBP) to upgrade WUFI® Passive. And now, I’m happy to report that the Fraunhofer IBP has released WUFI Passive version 3.2!

This upgrade comes with many improvements, including full support of PHIUS+ 2018 modeling protocols and performance requirements. WUFI Passive is the only accepted modeling tool for PHIUS+ 2018 certification. Below is a summary of updates. Refer to the PHIUS+ Certification Guidebook v2.0, Section 6 for further details.

PHIUS+ 2018 Compliance Updates

PHIUS+ 2018 Criteria Calculator:

Space conditioning targets for a project can be calculated externally using PHIUS+ 2018 Space Conditioning Calculator or calculated within the software when PHIUS+ climate data, HDD65, CDD50, and marginal electricity price in $/kWh are input.

Source Energy Factors:
The source energy factors for electricity were updated, which dropped from 3.16 to 2.8 for the US, and to 1.96 for Canada.

Source Energy Targets:
The residential and non-residential source energy targets have been updated for PHIUS+ 2018. Source energy allowances for process loads in non-residential buildings can also be included in the reported target to verify compliance. See more on ‘Process Load Accounting’ below.

Air-Tightness Limit:
The air-tightness limit under PHIUS+ 2018 has been updated to 0.060 cfm50/ft2 for most buildings. For buildings 5+ stories of ‘Non-Combustible Materials’, there is now an adjusted target reported at 0.080 cfm50/ft2.

Renewable Energy Systems:
New options are included for modeling off-site renewable energy. The options are built in with the appropriate utilization factors according to PHIUS+ 2018 protocols.

DHW Calculation Methods:

PHIUS+ 2018 implements a new calculation method for hot water energy use of appliances, hot water distribution, and drain water heat recovery. See more under Technical Updates.

Technical Updates

Shading Calculation from Visualized Geometry:

WUFI Passive now harnesses capabilities of WUFIplus’ dynamic shading calculation to determine monthly shading factors based on the 3D visualized geometry. This includes shading from the building itself as well as any other surrounding structures that shade the building.

This calculation only takes a few seconds and greatly reduces the need for numerical shading inputs — speeding up the entire modeling process.

shading 3

Reveal Shading visualized:

Due to the new shading method described above, reveal or “in-set” shading for windows is now visualized in the 3D geometry when entered numerically.

Overhangs include ‘side spacing’:

Sometimes overhang depth and position are still in design and it’s easier if they aren’t included in the imported 3D geometry. They can still be input numerically. There is now the option to numerically enter an overhang that spans horizontally wider than the window width or is continuous across a façade.

shading 5

Removed shading landscape obstructions:

Due to the new dynamic shading method, horizontal/landscape obstruction entries have been removed. These may now be visualized in the 3D geometry instead.Accounting for these numerically with the new shading method is a work in progress and will be updated in the future.

Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, Clothes Dryers:

Annual energy consumption and hot water consumption for clothes washers, dishwashers, and dryers now follows ANSI/RESNET 301-2014 protocol, and the required inputs align directly with Energy Star ratings.

New Calculation Method for DHW Distribution:

New and improved methodology for designing and modeling DHW distribution has been implemented. The new method accounts for insulation on non-recirculating pipes, low flow fixtures, can more appropriately estimate hot water distribution losses from on-demand recirculation systems, and includes a tool to aid in the design of a DHW distribution network that will pass the on-site EPA WaterSense delivery test.

DHW 2

Drain Water Heat Recovery:

Drain water heat recovery can be an effective strategy in saving water heating energy by pre-heating incoming water with waste heat from shower drains, etc. A new mechanical system ‘device’ was added to support the calculation of drain water heat recovery when present

Process Load Accounting in Non-Residential Buildings:

A new tab under Internal Loads has been included to account for process loads. This allows for designating loads in the model as process loads. There is then the reporting option to include/remove them within the site & source energy results, and the option to increase the source energy allowance to include that load.

Process Loads 1

*Note: All process load allowances must be approved by PHIUS.

Modeling ‘Undefined’ or ‘White Box’ spaces:
A new non-residential occupancy mode was implemented to support modeling of Undefined spaces, i.e. in mixed-use buildings when a tenant is not yet determined. This simplifies one of PHIUS’ paths to certifying a mixed-use building.

User Friendliness

New Report: Site Energy Monthly Report

In addition to the existing results reports, a new report has been added to support comparison vs monthly utility bills. Previously in version 3.1.1, total annual Site and Source Energy use reports were available. This new report breaks the annual energy use into monthly estimates for both electricity and gas.

Site Energy 1

Updated Tool Tips:

The hover-over hints have been updated to align with PHIUS+ 2018 protocol. Activate them under Options>Usability>Tool Tip.

Case Name in footer of Reports:

In results reports, the project/case name was previously only shown on page 1. Now, you can activate the case name to be included in the footer of each page of the report. Activate under Options>Usability> Show project/case in footnote.

How to Update

Users of the professional version WUFI Passive 3.1 can download the update free of charge. Please log in to your account at the WUFI Web shop, there you can find the update link in the “My Orders” menu.

Free Tutorials: If you’re a beginner in WUFI Passive, utilize these free bite-size tutorials to guide you through your first model — http://www.phius.org/phius-certification-for-buildings-products/wufi-passive-tutorials

New capabilities in  v3.1:

New Heat Pump Device Types:

Two new devices have been added that follow PHIUS’ heat pump protocol. One for a Heat Pump Water Heater (with indoor compressor), and one that utilizes multiple heating COP ratings based on ambient conditions.

Data Recovery:

This is an auto-save feature that allows the user to define how often they want a file to auto-save, and how many ‘total’ files are saved (older versions from the same session drop off). Activate under Options>Usability.

Comment box:
Fraunhofer IBP implemented a comment box which allows users to add a unique comment to each input screen in the software. It can be used to remind yourself of a potential assumption that was made for an entry or use it as a log for model updates due to a change in design. If you’re submitting the project for PHIUS+ Certification, you can provide explanation for entries right in the software (though the feedback form is still the primary communication channel).

F1 for help files:
Before version 3.1, the WUFI Passive manual was a document external to WUFI Passive. The help files have been expanded and are integrated directly into the user interface! This feature can be accessed for any user input screen at any time using ‘F1’. There is an abundance of guidance here – take advantage of it, especially if you’re a first-time user.

Assign Data Button:
Along the top of the screen, an [Assign Data] button allows you to assign an entry (window type, shading entries, etc.) to multiple components at once. Huge time saver.

Export into XML File/Import from XML File:
User defined entries in your databases can be exported to an XML file and then can be shared with colleagues and (WUFI-friendly) friends. This includes all assemblies, materials, windows, HVAC devices, climates, etc. that have been created. Go to ‘Database>Export to XML’, and then select all items that you would like to be saved as an external XML file. If you receive an XML file, go to ‘Database > Import from XML’.

 

Transitioning from PHIUS+ to the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard

Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

 

Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

Lisa White, PHIUS Certification Manager

Certification Update: PHIUS will not accept PHPP v9 for PHIUS+ 2015 Project Certification

Up until now, Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) has allowed project teams pursuing PHIUS+ Certification to use one of two passive house modeling tools to model their projects: 1) WUFI® Passive, the passive building modeling software developed by Fraunhofer IBP in collaboration with PHIUS and Owens Corning, and 2) Passive House Planning Package (PHPP), the passive house modeling tool developed by the Passivhaus Institut (PHI). However going forward PHIUS will not be accepting the latest version of PHPP v9 for PHIUS+ 2015 project certification.

Since the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard in March of 2015, PHIUS’ standard now differs significantly from the PHI standard. Specifically, the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard uses climate-specific targets for space conditioning energy use (the first such passive building standard to do so), limits overall energy use for residential buildings on a per person basis (rather than a square footage basis), and now uses a different metric for air infiltration.

For the first six months after the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard went live, project teams could elect to pursue either the earlier PHIUS+ Standard or the new PHIUS+ 2015 Standard. All new projects registered after September of 2015 are required to pursue certification under the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard.

 

Modeling Tools for Certification

Since the release of WUFI Passive in 2012, PHIUS has stopped teaching PHPP software during Certified Passive House Consultant (CPHC®) training and began exclusively teaching passive building energy modeling with WUFI Passive. PHIUS has since trained over 1,100 building professionals in the WUFI Passive software to date. In conjunction with the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard, Fraunhofer released WUFI Passive v3.0, which includes a “PHIUS+ 2015 mode”. This software is uniquely suited to PHIUS+ 2015 projects, the North American passive building market, and is available for free on the Fraunhofer website.

Previously, project teams could use either WUFI Passive or PHPP for PHIUS+ project certification, and PHIUS continued to accept both modeling tools even after the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 standard. However, this was not without extra effort from the PHIUS project reviewers, as each PHPP submitted for PHIUS+ 2015 certification required a bit of “jury-rigging” in order to verify compliance with the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard. This adds time, and likely an extra layer of confusion, to the certification process.

In October 2015, the PHI released PHPP v9[1]. While this new software offers a variety of updates and new calculation protocols, PHIUS feels this software is no longer appropriate to verify compliance with the PHIUS+ 2015 Standard. As these two passive building standards diverge, the verification software also suitably continues to diverge. This ultimately does not come down to which software is “better”, but rather is simply about which software tool is most appropriate for each standard.

PHIUS will continue to accept earlier versions of PHPP for PHIUS+ 2015 certification, from the “06-02-10” IP overlay of the 2007 PHPP up through PHPPv8.5, but will not accept PHPP v9 for PHIUS+2015 certification. Eventually PHIUS will only be accepting WUFI Passive for modeling of PHIUS+ 2015 projects, but the date for this has not yet been determined.

For project teams with completed PHPPs that would like to transition over to WUFI WUFI logoPassive, PHIUS is offering a new service for a “one-time conversion” of your project from PHPP to WUFI Passive. The flat fee of $1000 for this service also includes the creation of a SketchUp file for the building and a walk-through of the completed model with PHIUS Certification staff. Contact certification@passivehouse.us for more information.

If you are a CPHC who has been meaning to venture into the world of WUFI Passive, PHIUS offers WUFI Passive training programs at various locations throughout the year to help get you up to speed on creating your own models in the software. Visit the WUFI Passive Training page for more information and to register for upcoming trainings.

Lastly, keep in mind that modeling tools are a small (albeit integral) part of the big picture. Try not to lose sight of the overall goal, which is to build energy efficient and resilient buildings that help to reduce the carbon footprint of the built environment. Regardless of your program preference, every step toward these goals is a step in the right direction.

 

[1] PHI allows project teams to pursue certification under previous iterations of their passive house standard as well as earlier versions of PHPP. However PHI’s new PER metric (the PE metric was used previously) requires using PHPP v9, the only version of the software able to calculate this. Thus PHPP v9 is not yet required for all projects; a sunset date for older versions of the standard and software has not yet been determined. For more information, see the “Criteria for the Passive House, EnerPHit and PHI Low Energy Building Standard” document on PHI’s website.

 

 

About WUFI Passive 

WUFI Passive is a powerful modeling program that dramatically improves the quality and efficiency of the passive building design process for Certified Passive House Consultants (CPHC®). The software allows for calculation of both static passive building energy modeling, as well as dynamic energy modeling for comfort and hygrothermal analysis. The user-friendly interface allows for SketchUp & Revit import, incorporates a seamless toggle between SI-IP, and generates high quality results reports for communication with clients and the PHIUS Certification team. Learn more at the WUFI website.

 

About the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard 

Developed in cooperation with Building Science Corporation under a US Department of Energy grant, the PHIUS+ 2015 Passive Building Standard is the first and only passive building standard based upon climate-specific comfort and performance criteria aimed at presenting an affordable solution to achieving the most durable, resilient, energy-efficient building possible for a specific location. PHIUS+ 2015 is also the only passive building standard on the market that requires onsite QA/QC for certification.

Buildings designed and built to the PHIUS standard consume 86% less energy for heating and 46% less energy for cooling (depending on climate zone and building type) when compared to a code-compliant building (International Energy Conservation Code IECC 2009), resulting in an overall site Energy Use Intensity (EUI) of approximately 10-20 kBTU/ft2 year.

10th Annual NAPHC – best party of the year, maybe ever…

Wow – was that a successful conference! It has been a week and I am still processing it all. Chicago was unlike any other conference — things did not slow down in the office after it was all over, they rather accelerated. It indeed appears we have reached a tipping point.

From more than one person I heard that it seemed that the quality of work, detailing expertise and technical knowledge, size of projects and complexity of building types had reached a new high. And, compared to the early years, we were not just talking theory and intentions—but what people had done! Really impressive.

LEFT: Dr. Hartwig Künzel giving the Day 2 Keynote -- RIGHT: Sebastian Moreno-Vacca participating in the Architects' Hootenanny (L-R: T.McDonlad, T.Smith, J.Moskovitz, Sebastian, ?)

LEFT: Dr. Hartwig Künzel giving the Day 2 Keynote — RIGHT: Sebastian Moreno-Vacca participating in the Architects’ Hootenanny including (l-r): T.McDonald, T.Smith, J.Moskovitz, Sebastian, C.Hawbecker)

New modeling tools such as WUFI Passive (Technical keynote Hartwig Künzel, day two) are making building science interrelationships more visible and intuitively understandable. WUFI Passive is enabling CPHCs to optimize designs using “hygrothermal mass” (ever heard of that?) to optimize humidity loads and even to inform design decisions overall (as Sebastian Moreno-Vacca illustrated in his session) to create a unique architectural language! How cool is that! Science, heat fluxes and thermal dynamics begin to shape architectural form.

Dirk Lohan, Principal, Lohan Anderson -- Welcomes conference attendees to Chicago

Dirk Lohan, Principal, Lohan Anderson — Welcomes conference attendees to Chicago

Dirk Lohan—Mies Vander Rohe’s grandson, and an extremely accomplished architect in his own right—hinted at this development during his welcoming remarks.

“I believe that we will begin to see as beautiful what also is energy-conscious,” said Lohan.

Supported by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

But maybe the most significant news is the explosive development in the multifamily affordable housing sector. It is seeing significant growth, interest and pilot developments going up in many places of the country. Thanks to the support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, we were able to make this our core topic for the conference and will be able to actively provide support to the affordable development community.

The pre-conference sessions included a daylong affordable housing Hootenanny that brought together successful affordable, multifamily housing project teams together who generously shared lessons learned and experience. Four different project teams presented during an intense full day. The morning and afternoon presentations drew full rooms of affordable housing developers who soaked up the information and had terrific, incisive questions

The same teams presented again during the core conference breakouts in a more condensed form for those who were unable to attend the hootenanny. In addition, there were more presentations on even bigger size affordable projects in progress:

  • A 101 unit affordable development in New York now under construction in the Rockaways (Steve Bluestone, Bluestone Org.)
  • A planned affordable retrofit of a 24 story historical brick building in Chicago (Doug Farr, Tony Holub from Farr and Assoc.), the Lawson House.
  • 24 story residence hall under construction in NYC (Matt Herman, BuroHappold)
L-R: Steve Bluestone presenting with Lisa White, Doug Farr, Matthew Herman

L-R: Steve Bluestone presenting with Lisa White, Doug Farr, Matthew Herman

Really amazing stuff.

Katherine Swenson

Katherine Swenson, Vice President, National Design Initiatives for Enterprise Community Partners — Day 1 Opening Keynote

Of course this growth has been fueled by forward-looking programs that recognize that energy efficient homes make so much sense for affordable housing developers/owners and dwellers. Katie Swenson from the Enterprise Foundation was a breath of fresh air–dynamic, positive, and motivating opening keynote. She explained that in her and her organization’s eyes energy is a critical part in assuring not just housing for people—but healthy housing! “Health is the new green,” she said, and of course passive housing delivers here with excellent comfort, indoor air quality and the added bonus of resiliency when the power goes out. Katie announced that the Green Communities criteria had just included PHIUS+ 2015 certification as one of the highest energy point options.

Other affordable housing agencies also have made a move: the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA) awarded bonus points in its last round of selecting projects for Low Income Housing Tax Credits. More recently the New York State Homes & Community Renewal (HCR) effort was mentioned in a release regarding energy efficiency measures from the White House. Those agencies now directly encourage passive building standards in their RFPs. Remarkable!

Sam Rashkin, U.S. D.O.E. -- Closing Plenary Keynote

Sam Rashkin, U.S. D.O.E. — Closing Plenary Keynote

On the other coast. Seattle just amended their multifamily building code to allow additional floor area ration (FAR) for projects that meet the PHIUS+ 2015 criteria. That’s a significant incentive for developers.

Things are cookin’!

The core conference, as usual, was chock full of goodness. There were examples of how the new PHIUS+ 2015 climate specific passive building standards helped to optimize costs both here in North America (presentations by Chicago’s Tom Bassett-Dilley, Dan Whitmore, and) and internationally (Günther Gantolier from Italy). There were nuts-and-bolts presentations on wall assembly solutions (Tom Bassett-Dilley again), air and water barrier best practices (Marcus and Keith). And, the Builders Hootenanny—led by Hammer & Hand’s Sam Hagerman, focused on component challenges such as sourcing airtight FDA approved doors for commercial construction.

The U.S. DOE’s Sam Rashkin closed the conference with an unexpected message: he suggested that we needed to rename a few things to facilitate behavioral change. He posited that ZERH, LEED, PHIUS and other green building programs are essentially fossil fuel use rehab centers trying to rehabilitate an addicted nation and to show how it can be done differently. He received a standing ovation.

A few more comments on pre-conference workshops – three WUFI Passive classes drew almost 80 people and they all were super happy throughout the two days! Who would have thought! Happy people energy modeling!

LEFT: Marc Rosenbaum's lecture on Renewables -- RIGHT: Joe Lstiburek on Multifamily Building Science & HVAC

LEFT: Marc Rosenbaum’s lecture on Renewables — RIGHT: Joe Lstiburek on Multifamily Building Science & HVAC

Marc Rosenbaum single-handedly won first place in registering the most people for his class to connect passive principles with renewables to get to positive energy buildings (the logical next step).

Joe Lstiburek placed a close second (sorry Joe) and did a phenomenal job in covering ventilation concerns in large multifamily buildings. Rachel Wagner showed the most awesome cold climate details that I have ever seen. Galen Staengl took folks on a spin to design multifamily and commercial mechanical systems.

And Gary Klein topped it all off by reminding us that without efficient hot water systems design in multifamily, no cigar!

Thanks to all presenters and keynotes! You made this an excellent and memorable event.

I have not even mentioned the first North American Passive Building Project Awards—the entries were just beautiful projects—check out the winners here. I must mention the overall Best Project winner of 2015, as I believe this is pivotal: Orchards at Orenco. What a beautiful project, the largest fully certified PHIUS+ project in the country to date, a game-changer, underlining affordable multifamily projects on the rise.

I’m extremely happy that the Best Projects winners for young CPHC/architects was a tie, and both winners are women! Congrats to Barbara Gehrung and Tessa Smith! Go girls, you are the next generation of leaders!

L-R: Best Overall Project: Orchards at Orenco; Best Project by CPHC under 35 (tie): Island Passive House, Tessa Smith; Best Project by CPHC under 35 (tie): ECOMod South, Barbara Gehrung

L-R: Best Overall Project: Orchards at Orenco; Best Project by CPHC under 35 (tie): Island Passive House, Tessa Smith; Best Project by CPHC under 35 (tie): ECOMod South, Barbara Gehrung

One last note on a thing: Passive building people know how to party while devouring the most challenging, inspiring energy science, details, philosophies (Jevons paradox – Zack Semke’s fascinating lunch keynote) from the field.

And the architectural boat tour on Saturday to top it all off was almost surreal. When we were all out on Lake Michigan and the fireworks went off over the magnificent skyline, I thought, “that’s how we roll :).” Plus, the docent from the Chicago Architecture Foundation was a font of information, and even long-time Chicagoans learned a lot along the way. If you weren’t there, you missed the best passive building party of the year, maybe ever. (But we’ll try to top it, promise.)

Finally, for the crew that just can’t get enough, the Passive Projects Tour on Sunday was, as always, an enormous hit. Tom Bassett-Dilley and Brandon Weiss put together an array of completed and in-progress projects that generated a buzz at every stop. Thanks to Tom and Brandon and to PHA-Chicago for all your help!

Cheers!

Kat

 

Climate Data and PHIUS+ 2015

 

Adam2smAdam Cohen is a principal at Passiv Science in Roanoke, Va, a PHIUS CPHC®, a PHIUS Builder Training instructor, the builder/developer of multiple successful passive building projects, and a member of the PHIUS Technical Committee. With the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 climate-specific standard, Adam weighs in on the importance of climate data sets.

Project teams have always needed to be discerning about climate data sets they use in energy modeling.  Whether it’s WUFI Passive, Energy Plus, PHPP or any other software, the old adage garbage in = garbage out applies. Project teams always must analyze and make a call as to how accurate the climate file is.

For example, I worked on a Houston, Texas project a number of years ago and there were several climate datasets that were close and one that was very different. As a team, we had to decide how to approach this in the most logical and reasoned way.

Recently as I analyzed a Michigan project, I determined that my two dataset choices were “just not feeling exactly right” so I asked PHIUS’ Lisa White and Graham Wright to generate a custom set. I can’t know that this one is exactly right, but I know that it’s as accurate and “right” as we can make it.

Note that when multiple data sets are candidates, it is not just altitude that matters, but location of weather station (roof, ground, behind a shed, etc.). Ryan Abendroth blogged on the subject of selecting data sets (and when to consider having a custom dataset generated) and I recommend you give his post a read.

Since PHIUS+ 2015 is a climate specific standard, it’s all the more important to use the best available.  We all know that bad data is not exclusive to PHIUS (remember the Seattle weather debacle in early versions of the PHPP).

It’s incumbent on project teams to use science, reason and judgment in interpreting climate data sets. Being on the water, in the middle of a field or in the tarmac of an airport makes a difference.

In New York City, for example, we have an oddity: There are three dataset location choices.

A satellite photo of NYC with Central Park outlined. The climate date for the Park is substantially different than that for other parts of the city.

A satellite photo of NYC with Central Park outlined.

One is Central Park, and the PHIUS+ 2015 targets for that are substantially different than the others. But, counter to a Tweet calling into question the validity of the PHIUS+ NYC target numbers, they are different because the Central Park climate data is substantially different – probably due to vegetation countering the urban heat island effect. It has a dramatic and pretty fascinating effect on the microclimate, and the U.S. DOE has a nice read on the subject.

For project teams lucky enough to have access to multiple data sets for their location, by rational comparison, they should be able to make an intelligent decision to use a canned set or to have a custom set generated.

It also more important than ever that the PHIUS+ certifiers to examine the weather data provided by a project teams to see if the project team made a logical, rather then an easy selection of climate data.

In addition, we on the PHIUS Technical Committee will continue to collect and monitor data and will tweak certification protocols as we see the need. But, I remind all my fellow CPHCs that bad climate data sets are endemic in the industry and it is important that project teams make careful decisions and that they reach out to PHIUS staff to help when climate data sets just don’t seem right.