Building a ZERO Carbon Future, Together!

Katrin HeadshotPhius Co-Founder and Executive Director Katrin Klingenberg wrote this week’s blog post in advance of her “Zero Energy and the Future of Phius” webinar on Sept. 14. It covers a variety of topics related to Phius’ work and the expanded vision of the organization.

“The west is on fire, and the east is drowning.”

Those attention-grabbing words were the first thing I heard when I turned on my TV the other day.

“The levees held, but the power grid folded”

That was a headline from the day after hurricane Ida swept across Louisiana. Most of the state was left without power; temperatures in the aftermath were predicted to rise into the 100s, all after a ton of rain and flooding. The combination of high temperatures and humidity is life-threatening — on top of all the other hardships brought on by the storm.

And then there was the Texas winter with the grid folding and people and pipes freezing in homes…

The urgency is clear. At our most recent Phius board retreat there was consensus: we are in dire straits climate-wise — it is now or never.

Since its inception, Phius’ vision has had a North Star: to create a carbon-neutral, healthy, safe, and just future for everyone by mitigating the climate crisis. And our mission is to do just that by making passive house and building standards mainstream.

The vision was extended to using passive house and building principles as the basis for all zero-energy and carbon designs. We added the Phius Source Zero certification program in 2012. Net zero is a good first step, but we need to revise the framework. In practice, net zero isn’t enough. 

The conclusion we at Phius have reached — following the thought leadership of our Senior Scientist Graham Wright — is that we need to aim to reach absolute zero in short order to avert the ultimate climate crisis. And that is absolute zero as per the original definition of zero – the absence of a measurable quantity.

A New Brand

We are upping our game on multiple levels in order to emphasize our renewed commitment to solving the ZERO-carbon puzzle for buildings. 

New Brand Same Phius GraphicWe started by reimagining the Phius brand. We are updating its look and making products and messages more relatable without sacrificing what we are known for: scientific rigor, precision, quality assurance, proven guidance, and performance. We are also unifying and expanding our suite of certifications for buildings, products and professionals. We are upping the ante on benefits to our professional members under the Phius Alliance leadership and yes, we are creating exceptionally cool swag to encourage everyone to join our tribe and make it our lifestyle together! Together, our community is creating momentum in the market — and having fun with it!

We also re-organized ourselves internally in more efficient ways over the last year, invested in a new website and a CRM, architecture. And we doubled our staff — to aim for greater, faster and increasingly exponential impact and service for our stakeholders. 

In addition, we are making dedicated efforts to reach out to communities beyond the building industry, to explain why what we do matters to everyone. Renters and owners all have a stake in what we do, and we are all one or the other. We want to give everyone an opportunity to get involved. It is up to all of us now! Join us!

Expanded Vision

Over the last decade, Phius has become the global leader in defining cost-effective and climate-optimized, passive house and building standards. Phius certified projects are now coming in at little or no cost premium compared to conventional buildings. Phius also leads in professional training, certification, and workforce development. We also provide an element critical to mainstream adoption: Quality assurance and risk management.

The building sector accounts for 40 percent of carbon emissions, and is key to achieving emissions reduction goals. Passive house and building principles have been, and will continue to be, CORE to our efforts. In that spirit, the formerly known PHIUS+ building certifications have been renamed and expanded. 

PHIUS+ will now be referred to as Phius CORE (before renewables) and PHIUS+ Source Zero will now be Phius ZERO (based on CORE), and will extend to netting out emissions on an annual basis. New passive house and building retrofit certifications are in the offing as well. Phius CORE REVIVE and Phius ZERO REVIVE, as well as a new commercial building certification called Phius CORE COMM and Phius ZERO COMM will be introduced in 2022. 

Phius certifications have grown exponentially around the continent in recent years. Policy progress nationwide has been impressive to say the least. We are in Tarrytown, New York, for PhiusCon 2021 (formerly North American Passive House Conference) to celebrate the leadership of New York State/NYSERDA in formulating an aggressive climate action plan — a process which Phius helped inform. Other states, such as Massachusetts, have modeled their plans after New York’s. Phius’ pre- and fully certified unit count in Massachusetts over the last few years alone is impressive.

Phius Housing Units (In Process or Complete)

 

The Phius Alliance has expanded nationally, and the global network continues to grow. Phius projects have now been completed or are under way in many countries with varying climate zones. The Phius professional training has been translated into Japanese and has been taught this year successfully in Japan by Phius partner PHIJP.

The last decade was focused on figuring out the building part of the decarbonization equation (mission accomplished — solving for climate, cost, comfort). Now it’s time to expand beyond the building itself. We see Phius buildings as valuable capacitors of the new, renewable grid. They are low-load buildings that have the ability to load-shift and shed, which is immensely beneficial to the optimization of the overall grid design and resilience. 

Phius has begun to assess and measure the benefits of low-load buildings for the overall grid design, including micro and nano grid models. We call this initiative Phius GEB (Phius Grid-interactive Efficient Buildings) led by our Associate Director Lisa White. A pilot for a microgrid Phius community certification is underway. Buildings plug into the grid, and new opportunities for synergies and resilience arise. Design for the best result does not stop at the building envelope or lot line. 

Our new teal-colored logo symbolizes this expanded vision. It is a closed loop symbolizing whole systems design on all levels, aiming at harvesting adjacent system synergies: “The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” The color teal represents clarity of thought, rejuvenation, open communication and integrity. 

Same Phius

While Phius will be steadily expanding its zero-carbon framework beyond its hallmark passive house and building standards, we will maintain our core competencies of aiding in design, building, policy writing and quality assurance. We are working to solidify and upgrade our foundational programs. Certification staff has doubled and processes are being refined. We are working on getting even better at what we already do well!

The Phius focus has evolved to the broader task of decarbonization. We’ll do so with the same scientific rigor and attention to detail as before. Our goal is the next level of systems optimization so we as a society can make real-time ZERO carbon (not just net) a reality soon!

We hope you’ll join us and continue to trust us to pave the way for the future of decarbonization strategies. There is still lots to do, so let’s get to it!

Early morning decarb musings…from the bottom up…join the conversation!

Note: After contributions from a number of fantastic guest bloggers, Katrin Klingenberg makes her return to the Klingenblog to give readers an inside look at her quest to achieve carbon neutrality both in her own life, as well as with her work at Phius.

It is June of 2021. Sipping my morning tea, reflecting. It has been a year of thought and reassessment and remembrance, letting go of the old ways…quiet before the storm…I feel grateful almost …the pandemic was harsh…training wheels for what is to come…are we ready?

In interviews with journalists, I often get asked: what was/is your core motivation? Why did you start Phius?

And my response is always along these lines: “I was looking for carbon neutrality in all aspects of my life; to take personal responsibility in light of a crisis, wanting to do my share, love and respect for the commons, a desire to distribute resources fairly so that all people can live in peace, balance and harmony.”

And then, as an architect, I recognized that buildings represent a big chunk of our global carbon emissions. Phius was my chance to be part of the solution. My professional commitment since 2002: I could no longer continue to add to the planetary carbon bill with my work. That effectively meant setting up every building to be capable of achieving zero and positive energy.

Climate change is an existential crisis that no one will be able to talk their way out of. There are no planet hospitals with a line out the door that impress on us how bad this is, no healthcare providers ringing the alarm. Well, actually…scientists and environmentalists have been sounding the alarm since the 60s. Society stuck its head in the sand and decided on doing fossil fuel biz as usual as if there was no tomorrow (pun intended). Consequently, we are really up against the wall now. We need courageous, superhuman really, political will and global consensus, turning every conventional notion of how things used to work upside down. We need a fast and effective campaign to inoculate our economies against the effects of shifting away from fossil fuels as fast as possible, just as fast and successful as the COVID-19 vaccination campaign.

The good news: Carbon neutrality is within reach. We are so close. That was our goal on our inaugural website in the mid 2000s. The Passive House Institute US declared its mission: making passive building standards code by 2020. 

For all intents and purposes, check! We effectively have achieved that goal in places that matter a lot, not as mandatory code but in the form of programs, incentives, local laws, alternative compliance paths: New York City, the State of Massachusetts, Washington State, Washington DC. And we initiated ASHRAE 227p. So, yes, on our way, check!!!!

And in its 2021 standards update, Phius made a very important decision – the flagship certification, while the zero energy passive baseline still exists – is now the Phius ZERO certification. I am so proud of our team, how far we have come as a community and how patiently we have built this shift together over the last 20 years. It is a marathon, not a sprint — sound familiar?

But we need to pick up the pace. Turning the entire building industry around is only step one. Even if we eventually build all new construction to our proven standards, decarbonize all buildings through deep retrofits, and decarbonize the energy supply, we still urgently need everybody’s help from the bottom up to take action.

That’s really what I’d like to discuss here. Start a discussion about meaningful personal action that can be taken by anyone who chooses to go in on this really important mission.

I’ll go first. Since all this has been a driving force in my entire life really, it has shaped my life path and my choices. Carbon neutrality requires rethinking and changing a few things.

In 2002, I decided that if I truly believed in the commons and fair share of resource distribution for everyone, I would have to walk the walk. 

I tried to determine the standard of living that could be attained by everyone in an equitable society while also meeting the carbon reduction goals required to adapt to and mitigate climate change. That meant reassessing everything in my life: where do my actions and life contribute to the problem and how can I fix it? Once you start thinking about it in this way it really ripples through everything. 

Let’s start with money. We all need to earn money to run our lives. Our economies run on oil. Every dollar in our pocket essentially represents wealth generated in some form by fossil fuels. The more dollars any one of us has, the more emissions you are essentially responsible for in your daily life transactions (carbon footprint by wealth category is another interesting topic, another blog). I decided to limit the money I was going to earn. And I decided to put the money I did earn back into the non-profit Phius to support market transformation toward zero energy buildings. 

I then, step by step, dialed in my living circumstances: how much space I was able to live in to stay within my fair-share space conditioning emissions budget, how much land around my house there should be and how I was going to use it (farming), my choice of car, vacation and travel miles, food choices…all had to be reassessed.

It was a process. But I’m happy to report that in 2021, reflecting over morning tea, I feel good. I feel really, really good about having achieved what I set out to do…at least in my personal life.

Smith House

Smith House

With little money to my name and no job at the time, I embarked in 2002 on building the Smith House like there was going to be no tomorrow if I did not do it. It was scary, but it turns out, where there is a will there is a way. 

The Smith House, 1000 sq ft, meant for three people, was built for being zero energy ready. In 2018, I finally added a 5 kW PV system, taking the house and about 10K electric car miles per year (a car which I don’t have yet) off the planetary carbon bill. 

What I overproduce in Urbana “pays” for my condo living in the city (since I am not using overproduction to drive). I never turn my heat or air conditioning on. It’s a small, but nice and comfy apartment, 30 minutes walking distance from everywhere I need to go. I have not been on planes, trains and automobiles in a long time and if I do get on I am conscious of each mile. 

I changed my diet, essentially vegan plus fish and an occasional egg. Looking at carbon emissions savings from those food choices…turns out they are very significant. I try to avoid the elevator, though, full disclosure, my apartment and office are both on the 14th floor, so that’s a challenge. Down is easier than up, let’s start there.

And…I’d like to deep energy retrofit my condo tower…already have a plan…but that for the time being will have to be done in the future.

What are your stories?

If you are interested in making similar changes, 2000-Watt Society is a great place to start.

What does MS have to do with climate change?

Last September I was diagnosed with remitting-relapsing multiple sclerosis after a first—and frightening—attack. Despite the grim news I was intrigued by the elusiveness of the disease, and I started my journey of searching for answers and solutions to the question of how to best prevent or delay further attacks. I’ve learned a lot—and been reminded of a lot along the way.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a strange disease, characterized by so many different symptoms that some call it the disease with a 1000 faces. Little is known about the causes and consequently all approved therapies and medications aim at reducing symptoms, not at addressing a cause.

Yet, one thing most experts agree on is that there is likely a very strong environmental component to the disease. It is generally considered an autoimmune disorder —that is, the system that ordinarily protects one’s body from infections and other threats goes haywire. The autoimmune system attacks the body.

MS was first noted at the onset of the industrialized age at the end of the 19th century. There is no previous record of its incidence. Its occurrence has increased dramatically since and mostly in the developed richer nations. Significantly, the increase is most prevalent in nations that eat mostly a “meat and potato” diet, rather than a more Mediterranean or asian cuisine.

Changes in lifestyle over the past century (active/outdoor to sedentary/indoor), environmental factors such as increased toxins in air and water, and a shift in nutrition characterized by high animal fat intakes and highly processed food supplies are broadly suspected to be a significant part of the problem.

It’s been months since my diagnosis—during that time, after a lot of research, I made a decision to pursue a nutritional path to managing the disease over medication. Since that decision, the world has changed quite a bit for me for the better.

I found that the suggested causes and remedies were somewhat related to what started to look like an energy balance for a building. My systems had seriously gotten out of balance on every nutritional and lifestyle level! It’s become clear that my lifestyle for the last 10 or so years has systematically depleted my resources! I was running on fumes.

I felt somewhat consoled and excited by the fact that I knew something about rebalancing a system. I was accustomed to working on getting first to a balanced state through conservation and then eventually to a positive energy balance through consequent repletion. My thoughts were, if you can build a passive house you can rebalance your body, right? And here I went.

I began seeing real parallels between our efforts in the passive building community to rebalance resources with my individual efforts to rebalance my intakes. In each case, the goal is to assure that the taking and the giving is brought back into balance. A global society that constantly over-consumes and dumps tons and tons of carbon into the atmosphere as a result will eventually overwhelm the system and cause its collapse—just like my constantly depleting lifestyle depleted my body—and led to its attack on itself.

We live our lives by constantly going into debt with the planet’s resources (our body is a planetary resource) and think if we can just pay the minimum payment each month it does not matter how big our total balance is. Over-consuming and getting further away from being in balance and zeroing out our account, our modern lifestyles suffer from a similar effect.

I’ve read extensively about the interplay of ultra-busy but sedentary lifestyles and the perils of fast/processed food, factory farms and antibiotics, toxins, and increases in food allergies.

I’ve concluded that both MS and climate change are symptoms of excessive in-debtness with ourselves in the name of a convenient modern life style based on consumption, a life out of balance.

Ten years ago I made a resolution as an architect to work exclusively on passive buildings to take responsibility for my share of the rebalancing act. After my MS diagnosis, I made a similar resolution to rebalance my body and lifestyle instead of treating the symptoms with expensive medication and its own side effects. I soon found myself calculating an energy balance for my body, counting all different kinds of fats and oils and balancing them appropriately.  Every day I eat 7-10 servings of fruits and vegetables, multiple grain servings and watch out for a whole set of other interesting nutritional factors to strengthen the brain, rebuild the nervous system, the autoimmune system and the cardiovascular system. I have not been so clear headed, focused and energetic in years. I have lost 30 pounds without trying…but I still have work to do on my exercise regimen.

All this has dovetailed with my professional mission: my carbon footprint has significantly improved! I’ve almost entirely eliminated meat, and I forgo gluten, dairy, processed grains, and other packaged food products (all energy-intensive foods). I buy organic and pastured chicken, local if possible.

In a way it was easy for me to make that decision—MS is a powerful motivator. I always wanted to eat this way but never was able to maintain it because I managed to justify the modern shortcuts of fast food, pizza and beer in the name of convenience, helping me to de-stress and save time and work more.

But I’ve learned that equation doesn’t add up in the end, and that this type of diet is broadly recommended to avoid the most common diseases like cancer, heart disease, diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. All of these diseases are on a disturbing upswing. Just as the consequences of climate change is.

MS and climate change: they are similar looming invisible threats to our quality of life. Once an attack subsides things appear to be normal again and one is tempted to go back to business as usual and ignore the problem. But leaving the causes unattended will debilitate again, destroying quality of life, or life itself.

Here is my resolution: I don’t want to take any chances, neither with my body, the only one I have–nor with the planet, the only one I have. My body is an extension of my family, my house, my community, my city, my country, my planet.

MS and climate change are opportunities: they are second chances for us to end our follies and fix what we broke so that we may once again live in balance and peace. And that’s what I intend to do. And I think being in the passive house community puts me in terrific company. I’ve had terrific support, and I thank you all.

Meantime, there’s more to say about all this, but I’ll save it for a second installment….

Katrin

 

 

Part 3: NESEA BE13–the passive building journey continues…

 

OK, the finale! In part one we looked at the growth of passive building and how it’s reflected in Passive Place at BE13.

In part two we embarked on the passive building tour of the BE13 trade show floor–mapped to the fundamental principles of passive building.

Today, we introduce some unofficial passive building principles and visit some terrific partners.

Onward!

Unofficial passive building principle No. 6:

ASSURE QUALITY AND MEASURE YOUR SUCCESS!

Only PHIUS+ projects earn the plaque!

PHIUS (www.passivehouse.us) offers certification programs for projects and products. PHIUS+ Certification for new and retrofit applications is the only voluntary certification program in North America that requires a thorough design as well as an onsite third party review process. PHIUS+ certification is the most rigorous on the market–and the best value. That’s because PHIUS has partnered with the Department of Energy and RESNET. That means industry-standard certification protocols for design and onsite verification. And it means one-stop certification shopping. Earning PHIUS+ Certification also nets a HERS rating, DOE Challenge Home Status, and EnergyStar status.

PHIUS+ has jumpstarted certifications. We expect to have fully certified approximately 100 passive building projects by the end of 2013 in North America (if apartments are counted, then the number is closer to 200) and yes, the growth is exponential!

At the 7th Annual North American Passive House Conference in Denver last September, PHIUS launched its Window Data Verification Program. In cooperation with NFRC PHIUS is identifying a North American window data verification protocol and climate appropriate guidelines and recommendations. Several leading window manufacturers have signed on and submitted various window frame and glazing combinations for calculation and verification, and listing in the coming PHIUS window data base.

PHIUS recently partnered with PowerWise Systems–Booth 961 (http://www.powerwisesystems.com/passive) to promote their newest product – the inView Passive™ monitoring package. PowerWise offers all kinds of monitoring solutions for all building types—but we’re really excited about the value that the inView Passive monitoring package brings to our community. For passive builders, the proof is in the pudding–monitored performance is where it’s at. inView Passive includes monitoring dashboards optimized for typical passive house components and systems. We think it’s a great tool for anyone certifying a project through the PHIUS+ Certification and Quality Assurance Program.

Besides verifying predicted performance, monitoring systems like inView Passive can serve as early alerts for routine maintenance. For example, energy consumption might rise because a filter in the ventilator has not been cleaned on schedule. Monitoring also provides safety. Say one of the two ventilator fans fail; this could depressurize the house. Without monitoring, it might take some time to notice that indoor air quality declined, back drafting on vented appliances or fireplaces might have occurred or radon levels might have climbed.

inView Passive includes dashboards for typical passive house systems and components and indoor air aspects. Even a closed ground loop defrost system dashboard is included. Information on ordering the system and prices can be found on PHIUS’s website or on the PowerWise website. PHIUS has negotiated a 5% discount for all PHIUS+ certification enrolled projects and the Promo Code is available through PHIUS when registering.

The Energy Conservatory–Booth 828 (http://www.energyconservatory.com/) is the PHIUS+ Certified Rater’s best friend. Commissioning equipment for low load and airtight superinsulated homes has become more sophisticated and is now affordable.  What exactly has to be commissioned and tested? The most obvious—the air-tightness of the envelope needs to get tested during construction and then again upon project completion. For very tight homes the rater can now use the Mini-Fan Blower Door System, a duct blaster in a newly developed red door insert to test the entire building, A small fan is all it takes if the home is that tight! The mechanical ventilation system also has to be commissioned and flows have to be verified. Very small ventilation air flows need to be measured. The Energy Conservatory Flow Blaster Accessory measures air flows at diffusers down to very low levels such as 10 CFMs. And lastly FLIR infrared cameras are used to check insulation quality, thermal bridging and also interior surface temperatures. Indispensable tools throughout QAQC process to verify a building has been built as designed and performs.

 

Unofficial passive building principle No. 7:

SPREAD THE WORD, SHARE THE TALE AND TEACH ALL YOU HAVE LEARNED

The leading national passive building research, education and alliance organizations are the Passive House Institute US (PHIUS) (www.passivehouse.us) and the Passive House Alliance US (PHAUS) (www.phaus.org).

PHIUS was founded by myself and Mike Kernagis in 2003, initially as Ecological Construction Laboratory, a non-profit, promoting and building passive houses for low income home buyers. It changed its name later to Passive House Institute US when it went national. Since 2008 PHIUS has been offering the hugely successful CPHC®Passive House Consultant training nationwide (NEW in 2013: Virtual segment online saving cost and travel time), we have added Certified PHIUS+ Rater trainings and PHIUS Certified Builder trainings over the last few years. We have trained more than 800 architects, engineers, energy consultants and builders and have certified more 500 of them as CPHCs, PHIUS Certified Builders and PHIUS+ Raters in the US and Canada. These are the folks you want on your passive building team!

In 2013 the renowned Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, PHIUS and Owens Corning collaborated on a new next-generation passive building modeling tool – WUFI© Passive. WUFI Passive now replaces PHPP as the backbone tool of the CPHC training. Like PHPP, the tool includes a static passive house energy balancing capability. But it also offers dynamic whole building energy modeling and individual component hygrothermal analysis. And it covers another critical modeling variable: thermal mass, which is necessary for the cooling energy balance. In WUFI Passive all of these assessments use the same project data; no double entry of project data in multiple modeling tools is necessary. Risk and performance management all in one. This tool is seriously cool!

In 2009 PHIUS launched a membership/chapter program, the Passive House Alliance US (PHAUS). The mission: to support the community of professionals who had been trained, to educate the public, and drive the market by involving manufacturers and advocating for making passive building standards the norm in North America. Since Mark Miller took on the Executive Director role of this ambitious program in 2011, PHAUS has a thriving and growing membership program, now up to 350 members. PHAUS’ manufacturer sponsors program (amongst them founding sponsor CertainTeed and Rocky Mountain Institute) is growing, as is the chapter organization—now up to 13 nationwide Chapters with two pending.

PHIUS and PHAUS have significantly shaped the landscape of passive buildings in America over the past 10 years and will continue on our mission: the transformation of the marketplace to make passive buildings commonplace. We are a non-profit and if you like what we have done so far and would like to help, you can donate to PHIUS, become a PHAUS member, or certify and train with us.

Building Science Corporation (http://www.buildingscience.com/)  has been a leader in high performance building consulting and education for decades. BSC Principal Joe Lstiburek was a pioneer way back in the 1970s; that’s why at his keynote address at last year’s 7th Annual North American Passive House Conference, he closed his presentation with: “You guys are family.” I was totally moved—and I wasn’t alone. It was inspiring. Joe started building superinsulated buildings in the late 70s when he was just 23 years old!!! The details matched what we consider to be good passive building practice today. He has been on the forefront all along – vapor retarders, thermally broken fasteners, insulated foundation systems, energy heel trusses and even earth tubes (which he is not a great fan of )(link to his article). He knows what the trenches look like.

Building on that energy from the conference, BSC and PHIUS resolved to work together in promoting passive buildings. A first step: We decided to cooperate on the Passive Building University which lives on the PHAUS website (link): BSC bookends PHIUS executive certification classes with a Building Science Fundamentals program, the ultimate preparation for the CPHC Passive House Consultant class. BSC also offers Advanced Hygrothermal Analysis, truly building a science master class. I encourage you to visit BSCs table as they have the best selection of  cutting edge literature that applies to passive buildings. Be prepared to spend some money and schlep books home!

The most recent Yestermorrow CPHC class.

Yestermorrow Design/Build School (http://www.yestermorrow.org/) This past December I arrived in Warren, Vt.,for the second CPHC class offered through the Yestermorrow Design/Build school. Yet another full class, intense and dynamic.

How is Yestermorrow different? It teaches all modules in person on 8 consecutive days with the exam on the 9th. People are on site 24/7, they form study and discussion groups beyond the class time and prep for exam together. You talk bonding…the food is exceptional and the people who show up for this are some of the smartest and unique. Yestermorrow truly attracts exceptional individuals. The classes took the passive discussion to new heights and aside from that, Vermont is just stunningly beautiful – an unforgettable learning experience with a retreat flavor.

Passive House New England (http://www.passivehousenewengland.org/) is one of the first independent passive house groups in the country. Many of its members are some of the most experienced CPHCs in the country with one or more certified passive houses under their belts. This group is a great resource for anyone who is interested in building a passive house or building in the North East region. The group has a very active meet up group schedule and hosts a passive house symposium annually in the fall highlighting most recent projects of special interest. Great group: Get involved!

Passivhaus Maine (http://www.passivhausmaine.org/) is carrying flag in Maine in regards to passive house (don’t you love the lobster in the logo?). This is also an area that has very many experienced passive house consultants and builders solidly on their way. This group also is making strides by providing great information and by putting on symposia. Join the meet up group and help getting the word out!

Well, that’s about it–and that’s plenty!

Thanks to NESEA and all the friends out East that have given me the opportunity to do this review and I hope to see a few of you on the BE13 NESEA trade show floor!!!!!!