PhiusCon Pre-Conference: Building Science Rocks in Tarrytown!

There will be something for everyone at PhiusCon 2021 Pre-Conference, a great way to warm up for the PhiusCon Core Conference–all in Tarrytown, New York.

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Prudence Ferreira

Pre-conference starts on Tuesday, Oct. 12, with a trio of diverse sessions. One of our most highly anticipated sessions is “Phius Critical Path for Large-Scale Buildings” presented by BR+A Consulting Engineers Senior Associate and Phius Board Member Prudence Ferreira. With more than a decade of passive house experience to work from, Ferreira will share her approach and tools for approaching the more complex, large-scale Phius projects.

She has outlined the following learning objectives for the workshop:

  1. Define Phius critical path items and process
  2. Explore strategies and tools for managing complexity
  3. Examine energy modeling approaches for large-scale projects
  4. Analyze Phius protocols unique to large-scale projects
John Loercher

John Loercher

Running concurrently is “WUFI Passive for Beginners” featuring Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Building Science Program Director and Phius Certification Staff Member John Loercher. This session is meant both for those learning the WUFI Passive modeling tool for the first time as well as those who were exposed to it during CPHC® training, but have yet to use it on a project.

Katrin Klingenberg

Katrin Klingenberg

For those looking for a broader, more introductory workshop, there is “Passive Building 101” presented by Phius Co-Founder and Executive Director Katrin Klingenberg. This session offers a high-level overview of passive building, covering topics such as: passive house history, rationale for passive building standards, five core principles of passive building, certification processes, benefits of certification, and more!

Things won’t slow down on Oct. 13, as the sessions listed below make for a full day of passive building education and discussion.

  • Prescription for Better Buildings: Phius 2021 Prescriptive
  • Climate and Social Equity Workshop
  • Developer’s Multifamily Buildings of Excellence Case Studies
  • What’s My Size: Using the Newly Revised Manuals for VCHP Sizing

The “Climate and Social Equity Workshop” is free to attend, but registration is requested. It will be hosted by Clean Energy Works Managing Director Tamara Jones, HLW International Designer Satpal Kaur and Topsight Advisors LLC Principal Bomee Jung. The workshop will ask attendees to think critically about the topic of climate justice, which is the principle that actions to mitigate or adapt to climate change should equitably distribute their benefits, redress existing inequities, and dismantle institutional racism.

Mitsubishi Electric Trane US Sr. Product Manager Kimberly Llewellyn’s “What’s My Size: Using the Newly Revised Manuals for VCHP Sizing” workshop promises to be another highlight of the second day of Pre-Conference. She is one of the top mechanical systems experts in the country, and her presentation will focus on the management of humidity loads in high-performance buildings. Questions answered during the session are to include: When is an ERV enough to maintain acceptable interior conditions? What is the interplay of efficiency metrics for dehumidifiers vs heat pumps and where do rating metrics need to go in order to support development of HVAC equipment that can operate optimally in low SHF conditions?

We also don’t want you to forget about the New York City Passive Projects Tour, which is slated for Oct. 12 as well. Attendees will explore some of the largest, most innovative projects in the country. 

If you can’t get enough of Phius and passive house, you belong at PhiusCon 2021 Pre-Conference. Pre-Conference and Tour tickets are sold separately, so be sure to buy yours today!

 

PhiusCon 2021: Emissions Down, Scale Up — Together!

For four days in October, the center of the passive building world will be Tarrytown, New York.

That is to say that if there’s something important going on in the passive building world, we probably have an expert booked to discuss it at PhiusCon 2021. This year’s conference will be tucked away at the scenic Sleepy Hollow Hotel Convention Center in the beautiful Hudson Valley. It will have a distinct New York accent as we have partnered with New York State Energy Research and Development (NYSERDA) for the event.

The locale for PhiusCon 2021 is no accident. Thanks in large part to years of tireless effort by Phius and NYSERDA, New York has become the country’s unquestioned leader in climate action policy.

425 Grand Concourse 1New York State and NYSERDA have embraced passive building like nowhere else, and we are thrilled they have invited us to New York State where we can properly feature the progress that has been made in New York to our national and international audience at PhiusCon. As New York City’s gateway to the rest of the state, Tarrytown is the perfect location for PhiusCon 2021, allowing us to show off passive projects in the city and throughout the great state of New York.

Pre-Conference workshops will be running Oct. 12-13, during which attendees can immerse themselves in subjects ranging from multifamily for developers to climate and social equity and WUFI Passive.

The core conference is set for Oct. 14-15 and is to feature sessions covering the following topics and much more:

  • States’ and cities’ climate action and zero energy code progress
  • Innovation in finance and technology
  • Optimized methods to bring down cost for design, construction and manufacturing
  • Zero energy building + renewable energy grid solutions such as microgrids, energy storage, virtual power plants
  • Successful passive retrofit solutions including manufactured component approaches such as panel systems
  • International climate-specific passive projects
  • QA/QC professional experiences in multiple building typologies

The list of speakers for PhiusCon 2021 is as distinguished and diverse as we have ever had, as building science professionals from around the globe are slated to give presentations. Keynote speakers are to include: POAH Vice President for Design and Building Performance Julie Klump, Energy Circle Founder and CEO Peter Troast, and Building Science Corporation Founding Principal Dr. Joseph Lstiburek.

This is the first year in the conference’s history that there are two different passive project tours scheduled. There is a New York City tour scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 12, which will showcase some of the largest multifamily passive projects in the country. And the Hudson Valley tour on Saturday, Oct. 16, will include a variety of creatively designed single-family homes in the area.

The winners of our 2021 Passive Projects Design Competition will also be announced as part of the PhiusCon festivities. Winning and honorable mention awards for the competition will be given in five categories:

  • Single-Family
  • Multi-Family
  • Affordable
  • Commercial/Institutional
  • Source Zero

Entries are being accepted until Oct. 1. For more information on the design competition, visit the PhiusCon website.

 

COVID Protocols

The safety of all PhiusCon 2021 attendees is at the top of our minds as the state of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States continues to evolve.

We hope to alleviate any concerns held by prospective attendees by laying out the COVID-19 protocols that will be in place for PhiusCon

  • CDC recommendations related to masking will be followed and enforced
  • All State and local mandates related to COVID-19 will be adhered to
  • N95 masks and hand sanitizer will be made available to attendees
  • If you feel sick, do not attend the conference
  • Presenters will be distanced from attendees and masked during presentations

As of the time of this newsletter, there are no COVID-19 capacity restrictions in place at the Sleepy Hollow Hotel Convention Center where the conference is being held. For those who choose not to attend in person, there are virtual tickets on sale, which provide access to a live stream of select presentations. There is no plan to convert PhiusCon to a fully virtual event.
If you have any more questions or concerns related to the COVID-19 protocols at PhiusCon 2021, please email conference@phius.org.

Policy Update: New York State—Two Steps forward, One Step back

isaac picIsaac Elnecave, a member of the PHIUS certification team, has written this update on the New York State stretch cove.

Over the last year, the state of New York has made significant progress towards making the PHIUS+ standard an integral part of its energy code. It points the way to the end goal of creating a cost-effective net-zero energy code.

Besides its statewide base code, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) promulgates a “stretch” energy code (NYStretch-2020). The base energy code governs the energy requirements in buildings throughout the state. The requirements include such items as: the amount of insulation required in ceilings, walls and foundations, window performance, the level of air tightness, ventilation requirements, the efficacy of lighting and the efficiency of HVAC equipment. It is often described as the worst possible home that can legally be built.

A stretch energy code incorporates energy efficiency requirements that are more stringent than the base code (NYStretch-2020 is roughly 11% more energy efficient than the base code). While the base energy code is the default requirement across jurisdictions in the state, the stretch energy code must be affirmatively adopted by local municipalities (authorities having jurisdiction) that want to enforce it—at which point, it overrides the state code in that jurisdiction).

Besides providing energy savings beyond the base energy code, NYStretch-2020 was developed with the following goals in mind:

• Technically sound
• Thoroughly reviewed by stakeholders
• Written in code enforceable language
• Fully consistent with the 2018 IECC, ASHRAE 90.1-2016, and uniform codes

Moreover, NYSERDA strongly encourages, but does not require, that a jurisdiction adopting the NYStretch-2020 do so without making amendments.

In NYStretch-2020, there is a section for alternative compliance strategies (R-408), which specifically names passive house; a single-family home or low-rise multi-family certified under PHIUS+ would automatically meet code. The stretch code specifies that the specific space heat demand and (sensible only) cooling demand, as modeled and field-verified by a CPHC (Certified Passive House Consultant), must be less than or equal to 9 kBTU/ft2/year. A dwelling unit shall also be tested with a blower door and found to exhibit no more than 0.05 CFM50/ft² or 0.08 CFM75/ft² of air leakage. Ultimately, to provide a Certificate of Occupancy, a code official must submit a form that must indicate that the finished building achieves a CPHC verified specific space heat demand of less than or equal to 9 kBTU/ft2/year.

It is important to note that the PHIUS standard is even more energy efficient than the requirements in NYStretch-2020. Here is a link to NYStretch-2020: file:///C:/Users/phius/Downloads/NYStretch-Energy-Code-2020%20(7).pdf.

New York City
New York City provides an example of the importance of the stretch energy code. Local law 32 requires the city council to adopt the New York State Stretch code (allowing the inclusion of amendments). The language of the law is fairly clear:

Submit to the city council proposed amendments to this code to bring this code up to date with the most recent model stretch code published by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, provided that such model stretch code is more stringent than the New York State Energy Code in effect when such proposed amendments are submitted and provided further that such model stretch code was first published no more than three years before such proposed amendments are submitted;

As noted in the previous section, NYStretch-2020 is significantly more energy efficient than the base state code. Consequently, the city council is about to adopt NYStretch-2020 with one very important and unfortunate exception. R408, the section of NYStretch-2020 which allows for an alternate compliance path using PHIUS+, has been deleted. Here is a link to the proposed energy code  (Click on Int. No. 816 for the text of the code).

It is unclear as to why section R408 was deleted but it removes an important alternate compliance option for designers and builders. PHIUS+ incorporates both rigorous design standards with robust quality control protocols to ensure that the building is both energy efficient and well-constructed.

As the PHIUS standard is more energy efficient than the provisions of the NYStretch-2020, it also provides a target for future code improvements while giving designers and builders the time to develop expertise in building energy efficient dwellings; ultimately leading to the establishment of a net-zero energy code.

Climate Data and PHIUS+ 2015

 

Adam2smAdam Cohen is a principal at Passiv Science in Roanoke, Va, a PHIUS CPHC®, a PHIUS Builder Training instructor, the builder/developer of multiple successful passive building projects, and a member of the PHIUS Technical Committee. With the release of the PHIUS+ 2015 climate-specific standard, Adam weighs in on the importance of climate data sets.

Project teams have always needed to be discerning about climate data sets they use in energy modeling.  Whether it’s WUFI Passive, Energy Plus, PHPP or any other software, the old adage garbage in = garbage out applies. Project teams always must analyze and make a call as to how accurate the climate file is.

For example, I worked on a Houston, Texas project a number of years ago and there were several climate datasets that were close and one that was very different. As a team, we had to decide how to approach this in the most logical and reasoned way.

Recently as I analyzed a Michigan project, I determined that my two dataset choices were “just not feeling exactly right” so I asked PHIUS’ Lisa White and Graham Wright to generate a custom set. I can’t know that this one is exactly right, but I know that it’s as accurate and “right” as we can make it.

Note that when multiple data sets are candidates, it is not just altitude that matters, but location of weather station (roof, ground, behind a shed, etc.). Ryan Abendroth blogged on the subject of selecting data sets (and when to consider having a custom dataset generated) and I recommend you give his post a read.

Since PHIUS+ 2015 is a climate specific standard, it’s all the more important to use the best available.  We all know that bad data is not exclusive to PHIUS (remember the Seattle weather debacle in early versions of the PHPP).

It’s incumbent on project teams to use science, reason and judgment in interpreting climate data sets. Being on the water, in the middle of a field or in the tarmac of an airport makes a difference.

In New York City, for example, we have an oddity: There are three dataset location choices.

A satellite photo of NYC with Central Park outlined. The climate date for the Park is substantially different than that for other parts of the city.

A satellite photo of NYC with Central Park outlined.

One is Central Park, and the PHIUS+ 2015 targets for that are substantially different than the others. But, counter to a Tweet calling into question the validity of the PHIUS+ NYC target numbers, they are different because the Central Park climate data is substantially different – probably due to vegetation countering the urban heat island effect. It has a dramatic and pretty fascinating effect on the microclimate, and the U.S. DOE has a nice read on the subject.

For project teams lucky enough to have access to multiple data sets for their location, by rational comparison, they should be able to make an intelligent decision to use a canned set or to have a custom set generated.

It also more important than ever that the PHIUS+ certifiers to examine the weather data provided by a project teams to see if the project team made a logical, rather then an easy selection of climate data.

In addition, we on the PHIUS Technical Committee will continue to collect and monitor data and will tweak certification protocols as we see the need. But, I remind all my fellow CPHCs that bad climate data sets are endemic in the industry and it is important that project teams make careful decisions and that they reach out to PHIUS staff to help when climate data sets just don’t seem right.